The Party Line

The Party Line is dedicated to examining regional issues and policies through the figures who give shape to them. These are critical, complex, and even downright confusing times we live in. There’s a lot to navigate nationally and in the Carolinas; whether it’s elections, debates on gay marriage, public school closings, or tax incentives for economic development. The Party Line’s goal is to offer a provocative, intelligent look at the issues and players behind the action; a view that ultimately offers the necessary insight for Carolina voters to hold public servants more accountable.

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Map shows proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline route from West Virginia to N.C.
Atlantic Coast Pipeline

Oil and gas pipelines planned or under construction around the country have drawn protests - from neighbors, environmentalists and Native American groups. Now it's North Carolina's turn.

Three protest walks are planned this weekend in Cumberland, Nash and Robeson counties by a group hoping to stop construction of the $5 billion Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

This week, WFAE’s Lisa Worf has taken listeners through the process of seeking a court order to compel Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department to release video of a police shooting. (Here's the story that aired before our court hearing, and here's the story that aired after the hearing).

Donald Trump
WRAL.com


  Republicans had a big night in Mecklenburg County, and across the state in Tuesday's election.  They may have Donald Trump to thank. 

Tom Bullock / WFAE

It all comes down to this. After months (and months, and months) of debates, ads, political claims and counter claims, voters go to the polls and cast ballots in the 2016 general election.

So far so good here in Mecklenburg County with no major issues to report. There were reports of long lines at some voting sites this morning.

Charlotte Talks Host Mike Collins spoke with Michael Dickerson, the Director of Elections for Mecklenburg County this morning:


In our final chat before Election Day Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks about last minute campaign strategies, early voting results, and this week’s NAACP lawsuit with political analyst Michael Bitzer.

Early voting is up 10.7 percent in Mecklenburg County, compared with the last presidential election four years ago.  

As of Wednesday night, the 14th day of early voting, 211,876 people had cast early ballots in the county. That's up from 191,405 after the same number of days in 2012.

Voter registration is up just 4 percent since 2012, according to the Mecklenburg Board of Elections.

James Hoyt Wilhelm
Charlotte Observer

The CMS board voted this week to name a park at Cornelius Elementary School after Major League Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher and Mecklenburg County native James Hoyt Wilhelm.

Screen Grab via YouTube

No matter your preferred genre, be it rock, rap, country, pop, whatever, every live show follows a simple plan; the big draw goes last. 

That’s one thing that made Thursday’s campaign stop in Winston-Salem by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and First Lady Michelle Obama interesting. Ok, one of many.

Yes, it was the first time the two women took the stage at a campaign event this year. And yes, it comes at a key time in a battleground state.

Politicians love to brag about their endorsements. Those statements of support from other candidates, police or labor unions, newspapers, whatever.

On Friday, October 28th, Republican Governor Pat McCrory received an endorsement from a newspaper which, at first blush, sounds great for him. The endorsement starts with this question, “Which candidate would do the most to help our local economy?”

This election season, we’ve heard a lot about the presidential race, and campaigns for U.S. Senate and governor in North Carolina – and for good reason. We haven't heard much about state legislative races even though the General Assembly has fueled some of the year’s biggest political stories. Think House Bill 2, plus redistricting and changes to voting laws that were struck down in federal court.

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