Simeon Booker, Dean Of Washington's Black Press Corps, Dies At 99

Simeon Booker, the Washington bureau chief of Jet and Ebony magazines for five decades, died Dec. 10 at an assisted-living community in Solomons, Md., according to The Washington Post . He was 99 and had recently been hospitalized for pneumonia, his wife, Carol Booker, told the paper. Booker was the first full-time black reporter for The Post . The paper says "few reporters risked more to chronicle the civil rights movement than Mr. Booker." Booker is credited with helping to deliver the...

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FAQ City Voices

FAQ City: How To 'Compel' People To Interact With Those Different From Them?

WFAE asked Charlotteans for answers to this listener-submitted question.

The Avett Brothers are perhaps the most influential band to launch out of the Charlotte area. The two brothers, Scott and Seth, grew up in Concord and their distinct mix of folk and punk-rock music have earned them critical acclaim and an international following.

Rows Of Hot Pink Paper, All Saying #MeToo

Dec 10, 2017

Pink rectangles of paper, pinned to rows of clotheslines, festoon a gallery wall at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. Each slip bears a note, handwritten by a museum visitor, that answers a question about sexual harassment and violence.

"As a child in a museum I was flashed, as a teen in the university library I was groped, as a student at the college doctor, again I was groped. No place is safe. But each time I felt I had to be polite. Not next time!" reads one.

WSOC - TV

Updated Sunday 1:25pm

A man fatally shot his mother and wife Saturday morning, before turning a gun on his 12-year-old daughter and seriously injuring her, according to CMPD. Police say it appears 37 year-old Antioco Andrade Chacon then shot and killed himself.

Maude Julien's childhood was so horrible, it's difficult to read about. Her father wanted to turn her into some kind of superhuman, able to withstand any torment without flinching. So he treated her in a subhuman way: He forced her to stay in a dark cellar at night, to meditate on death. He made her hold on to an electric fence, to strengthen her will. She had to wait on him hand and foot. And he kept her from most contact with the outside world for years.

Alejandro La Luz Rivera pulled the keys from his pocket, unlocked the heavy gate, and walked slowly up the outdoor stairs leading to what used to be a rooftop patio. Before Maria, this was the 90-year-old's favorite place to be. Now, without electricity, it's not as quiet up here — he doesn't have a generator, but his neighbors do. And the patio is gone, destroyed by the hurricane and its winds.

"And I miss it a lot," La Luz said. "Because it was the area in which I spent a lot of time."

Health officials are warning that the United States may have an unusually harsh flu season this year.

But they stress that flu seasons are notoriously difficult to predict, and it's far too early to know for sure what may happen.

Update on Dec. 8, 2017: Franks now says he will resign as of Friday, rather than at the end of January, as previously announced.

Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., is the third member of Congress to announce his resignation this week, saying that he had discussed surrogacy with two female subordinates.

Sarah Delia

The Levine Museum of the New South is saying goodbye to its staff historian. Brenda Tindal has accepted a position as the director of education at the Detroit Historical Society. Her last day at the Levine Museum is December 8.

Friday, December 8, 2017

Mecklenburg County computers suffer a ransomware attack.  Duke Energy is also hacked.  Charlotte's new mayor and city council members are sworn in. And North Carolina’s Senators help pass the GOP tax bill. Our roundtable of reporters joins Mike Collins to talk about the week's local news when Charlotte Talks. 

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — A white former South Carolina officer was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Thursday for fatally shooting an unarmed black motorist in the back in 2015, wrapping up a case that became a rallying cry for the Black Lives Matter movement.

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FAQ City: Community-Powered Stories

FAQ City: How To 'Compel' People To Interact With Those Different From Them?

It’s time now to take one of your questions. Awhile back, one of our listeners submitted a question through our website asking if there was anything that could be done to compel Charlotte residents to interact with people different from them - something that could help the city counteract racial segregation that’s grown over the last decade. This question came to us from a listener who wished to be anonymous, and over the last month or so, we’ve posed it to several Charlotteans, both community leaders and average residents.

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Courtesy of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture, Duke University

Ask Us: Why Charlotte Pride Takes Place In August, And Not June

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Looking Back on 4 Decades of 'Car Talk'

Show's executive producer and listeners share their favorite memories

ONE YEAR LATER

Special Coverage on Anniversary of the Shooting of Keith Scott and Protests

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Charlotte Homicides In 2017 - A Look At The Victims

WFAE is tracking Charlotte’s homicides, and remembering the victims, through this interactive timeline.

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