World

The Two-Way
10:19 am
Wed January 2, 2013

More Than 60,000 Have Died In Syria, U.N. Estimates

An almost deserted, rubble-filled street in Aleppo, Syria (Oct. 9, 2012).
Tauseef Mustafa AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 10:47 am

Blaming the regime of President Bashar Assad for "ruthless suppression of what were initially peaceful and legitimate protests by unarmed civilians," the U.N. Human Rights Office today released a report that estimates at least 59,648 people had been killed in Syria through November in the protests and fighting there since March 2011.

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The Salt
10:01 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Docs Discover Drug-Spiked Eggplant Sent Beijing Diners To Hospital

Don't blame the braised eggplant. Two people reportedly poisoned a Beijing restaurant's eggplant dishes, similar to the one shown here, in an attempt to boost the business of a rival eatery.
yoppy Flickr.com

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:49 am

Here at NPR, we've heard about some wacky food scandals. There have been gingerbread houses harboring bad bacteria, turkeys trotting around with arsenic in their guts and a prison hooch that brewed up botulism.

But a recent report from China may take the cake –- or should we say, the eggplant.

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World
3:49 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Pakistan's 'Patriot Act' Could Target Politicians

A policeman stands guard at the Parliament building in Islamabad, Pakistan, in June. The Lower House recently passed a bill similar to the United States' Patriot Act, touching off a debate about privacy in the country.
Ahmad Kamal Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:16 am

Earlier this month, Pakistan's powerful Lower House of Parliament passed what analysts have dubbed Pakistan's Patriot Act. Its name here is "Investigation for Fair Trial Bill."

It has been presented to the Pakistani people as a way to update existing law and usher the rules for investigation in Pakistan into the 21st century. Among other things, it makes electronic eavesdropping admissible as evidence in court.

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Europe
4:16 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

'One Pound Fish': A Pakistani Man's Passport To Fame

Pakistanis welcome Muhammad Shahid Nazir, center, the singer of "One Pound Fish," at Lahore's airport Thursday.
Hamza Ali AP

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 2:19 pm

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The Two-Way
1:40 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

Attack On Aid Workers In Pakistan Leaves 7 Dead

A father of an aid worker, who was killed by gunmen, mourns the death of his daughter at a hospital in Swabi, Pakistan on Tuesday.
Mohammad Sajjad AP

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 1:03 pm

Following an already violent year in Pakistan, on the first day of the New Year gunmen shot and killed five teachers and two aid workers as they were driving home from work.

According to The Associated Press, the groups director said they may have been targeted for their anti-polio work, which would follow a pattern of attacks against charity and aid workers in Pakistan in recent weeks.

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Latin America
5:08 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Mexico's President Alters Tactics Against Drug Crimes

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It has been a busy year in Mexico's war on drugs. The administration of former President Felipe Calderon struck major blows to the country's largest cartels, slowing the violence that has claimed more than 50,000 lives.

But the new president, Enrique Pena Nieto, says he'll change tactics. He wants to go after the crime associated with drug trafficking instead of taking down crime bosses. His new attorney general says this is the right strategy, since the number of crime gangs working in the country has grown significantly.

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Middle East
5:08 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Israeli Election Campaign Includes Much Maneuvering

Originally published on Sun January 6, 2013 8:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Imagine getting ready to vote in an election and having no idea what the parties stand for or even who's running for which party. Well, that's close to the reality in Israel, where the political stakes are always high. Parliamentary elections are in just three weeks but a series of dizzying political maneuvers has left voters confused. Sheera Frenkel reports.

SHEERA FRENKEL, BYLINE: A couple of weeks ago, this advertisement by the left-wing Meretz Party went viral.

(SOUNDBITE OF AD)

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The Picture Show
5:03 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Around The World, Having A Ball

People celebrate the new year following a count-down event at the Summer Palace in Beijing.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 10:46 am

Some people choose to celebrate the arrival of the new year by staying home with a good book and cup of hot tea. Others go out to party, cheer, and bring in the year with as much fanfare as possible. (And of course, those are the people who tend to get photographed...)

Here's a look at how some folks around the world celebrated the arrival of 2013 — some with quiet moments, and some with as much revelry as possible.

And to all readers of The Picture Show, we wish a very happy new year to you.

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World
2:59 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Multiple Feuds Bring A Record Year Of Violence To Karachi

Gul Mohammed Khan has lost three sons in sectarian violence during the last two years, in Karachi, Pakistan. He stands here with some of his grandchildren who have lost their fathers. When he looks at his grandchildren, he says, he sees his sons.
Dina Temple-Raston/NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 10:35 am

The sad truth about Karachi in 2012 was that whatever your religion, business affiliation, or political party, someone was willing to kill you for it.

The murder rate in Pakistan's largest city and commercial hub hit an all time high last year. Over 2,500 people died in violent crimes in Karachi in 2012, a 50 percent increase over the year before.

Most of the deaths were attributable to sectarian killings and score settling. Shia Muslims took on the brunt of the violence. But Sunni Muslims were killed in reprisal attacks that added to the tally.

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Africa
2:18 pm
Mon December 31, 2012

Congo Fighting Leaves A Fragile City On Edge

Congolese women wait for food to be distributed at the Mugunga III camp for displaced people outside the eastern town of Goma on Dec. 2.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Mon December 31, 2012 8:16 pm

Goma, a city on the eastern border of the Congo, has been a magnet for war refugees for nearly two decades. And in an expanding camp for displaced people, called Mugunga I, school principal Emmanuel Kibanja Miteso holds up a three-ring binder that reflects the history of war here.

The pages are a logbook for parent-teacher conferences. Every time fighting flares in the region, people flood into the displacement camps and the roster of names swells in the principal's binder.

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