World

Animals
5:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Rhino Horns Fuel Deadly, Intercontinental Trade

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 6:55 am

NPR's Frank Langfitt and Gregory Warner have teamed up for a series about how myth and money are driving extraordinary slaughter of rhinos. They talk with host Rachel Martin about the issue, which has repercussions from the African continent all the way to Asia.

The Changing Lives Of Women
5:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

C-Sections Deliver Cachet For Wealthy Brazilian Women

Daniele Coelho holds her newborn daughter as doctors finish her cesarean section at the Perinatal Clinic in Rio de Janeiro on Aug. 2. Brazil has one of the world's highest rates of cesarean births.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 7:11 pm

The office is immaculate, as you would expect in an upscale neighborhood in Sao Paulo — all sterile, white, modish plastic furniture and green plants. Behind the reception desk are pictures that would look more appropriate in a pop art gallery than a private maternity clinic.

The list of services at the clinic in Brazil's largest city is long: fertility treatments, specialized gynecology and, of course, obstetrics. But one thing they rarely do here is preside over a vaginal delivery.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Experts Marvel At How Cyber Thieves Stole $45 Million

This week's massive cyber-heist was facilitated by the ease with which criminals have learned to hack the magnetic stripe on the back of ATM, debit and credit cards.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 7:00 pm

With a haul of $45 million, it's being billed as possibly the biggest cyber-heist in history. But in reality, experts and authorities say, it was thousands of small but highly coordinated thefts.

As we reported on Thursday, federal prosecutors charged eight people with being the just New York cell of an operation that allegedly encompassed criminal cohorts in 26 countries.

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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Pakistanis 'Defy Violence' To Vote In Landmark Election

Pakistani men lined up to vote in Rawalpindi on Saturday. Men and women cast ballots separately as millions went to the poll.
T. Mughal EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 11:17 pm

Despite attacks in the days and weeks leading up to Saturday's voting — and deadly bombings and other attacks on the very day they're going to the polls — Pakistanis are showing they're willing to "defy the violence," NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from Lahore.

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Middle East
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

How Hard Would It Be To Impose A No-Fly Zone In Syria?

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 10:11 am

So called no-fly zones have worked in the past, not always to change regimes but to help protect those trying to overthrow their government. Host Scott Simon talks with Kevin Baron of Foreign Policy Magazine's E-Ring blog about the possible imposition by the U.S. of such a zone in Syria.

Asia
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

What It's Like To Work In A Bangladeshi Factory

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 10:11 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Middle East
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Diplomats Hope Syrian Rebels' Losses Promote Collaboration

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 10:11 am

Syrian rebels are on the defensive these days, losing ground to new offensives by government troops. Western diplomats are hopeful the rebel losses will persuade their leaders to attend an international conference being organized by the U.S. and Russia to chart a path to peace in the blood-soaked country. Host Scott Simon speaks with NPR's Deb Amos.

The Salt
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Tiny Mites Spark Big Battle Over Imports Of French Cheese

Microscopic bugs called cheese mites are responsible for giving Mimolette its distinctive rind and flavor.
Chris Waits via Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 3:28 pm

The Food and Drug Administration is currently embroiled in a surprisingly heated culinary standoff — pitting French cheese-makers (and American cheese-lovers) against regulators, all because of one very small problem: cheese mites.

Cheese mites are microscopic little bugs that live on the surfaces of aged cheeses, munching the microscopic molds that grow there. For many aged cheeses, they're something of an industry nuisance, gently brushed off the cheeses. But for Mimolette, a bright orange French cheese, they're actually encouraged.

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Africa
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Media Focus On Ailing Mandela Is Not 'The African Way'

Congregants pray in front of a stained-glass window depicting South African statesman Nelson Mandela during Easter services at Regina Mundi Catholic Church in the Soweto of Johannesburg, South Africa, March 3. The church held prayers for Mandela, 94, who was in the hospital at the time.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 10:11 am

It's almost impossible these days to switch on South African radio or television, or read a local newspaper, website or tweet, and not hear Nelson Mandela's name mentioned.

Friday marked the 19th anniversary of Mandela's inauguration as South Africa's first democratically elected — and first black — president, four years after he was released from prison.

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Animals
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

To Count Elephants In The Forest, Watch Where You Step

Elephants gather at dusk to drink at a watering hole in Kenya.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 11:37 am

Imagine you're flying in a two-seater plane over Africa, and, in an effort to see how elephants are faring, your job is to count all the ones you see. Over the savannah, that's easy. But how do you peer into the forests, where all you see is treetops?

For years, the zoologists who tried to do this just guessed. But in the late 1980s, conservationist Richard Barnes devised a method to take an elephant census in the densest of forests.

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