World

Parallels
6:47 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Which Nations Hate The U.S.? Often Those Receiving U.S. Aid

A protester denounces President Obama during a march near Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 7. Bitter rivals in Egypt tend to be united in opposition to the U.S. government, which has been a leading aid donor to the country for decades.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 8:28 am

To figure out which countries dislike the U.S., one quick way is to simply look at which ones are getting the largest dollops of U.S. aid.

This wasn't the focus of a recent survey by the Pew Research Center. But it did emerge when Pew spoke to people in 39 countries about the U.S. and China, asking respondents if they had a favorable view of these two countries.

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Parallels
3:02 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Despite Many Threats, Afghan TV Satire Mocks The Powerful

Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, makes fun of government officials and other powerful figures in Afghanistan. Cast members are shown performing a skit during a taping of the show.
Sultan Faizy NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:10 pm

Saturday Night Live. The Daily Show. Zang-e-Khatar.

OK, maybe you haven't heard of that last one. But the comedy-sketch television show is well known in Afghanistan, where Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, is one of the most watched programs.

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Parallels
5:37 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

'Burqa Ban' Sparks Another Round Of Clashes In France

A Muslim woman walks in a Paris suburb where protesters clashed with police over the weekend. The demonstrators oppose the way the police have enforced a ban on Islamic face veils. Five people were injured and six detained in the unrest.
Olivier Corsan Maxppp/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 9:02 pm

France's ban on face coverings — the so-called burqa ban — has been the law since 2011, but it's still a sensitive topic.

The latest round of unrest began Friday when police officers asked a woman wearing a head-to-toe veil to lift the garment and show her face.

Authorities say the woman's husband attacked the police officer. Muslim groups say the police were disrespectful. The man was eventually arrested, which sparked protests that degenerated into violence.

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All Tech Considered
4:40 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

U.K. Cracking Down On Porn, Blocking It Unless Users Opt In

British Prime Minister David Cameron has announced plans to block Internet porn by default on all British computers.
Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 9:02 pm

Every home in the United Kingdom will be blocked from accessing pornography through Internet connections, under new measures announced by British Prime Minister David Cameron. When these go into effect later this year, Internet users who want to access porn will have to opt in with their Internet providers.

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Africa
3:59 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Morsi Family Accuses Egypt's Military Of Kidnapping

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 9:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

We begin this hour in Egypt. It's almost three weeks since President Mohammed Morsi was ousted by the military, and he has not been seen in public since. Today, his family accused the country's military chief of kidnapping him and promised to take legal action.

OSAMA MORSI: (Foreign language spoken)

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Africa
3:59 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Conspiracy Or Bureaucratic Neglect In Egypt?

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 9:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Earlier this month in Egypt, just after Mohammed Morsi was ousted from power, something strange happened: The electricity came back on, and long lines at gas stations disappeared almost overnight. This has led many in Morsi's camp to cry conspiracy. They say the so-called deep state - the army, the police and the massive bureaucracy nurtured by longtime leader Hosni Mubarak - actively worked against Morsi. But as NPR's Kelly McEvers reports from Cairo, the reality may be more benign.

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The Salt
2:38 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

How An Ethiopian Bean Became The Cinderella Of Coffee

Haleuya Habagaro says she always knew her coffee was exquisite. "When I roast the coffee, people come to ask where that strong fruity smell is coming from."
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 1:17 pm

As we reported during Coffee Week in April, coffee aficionados pay top dollar for single-origin roasts.

The professional prospectors working for specialty coffee companies will travel far and wide, Marco Polo-style, to discover that next champion bean.

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Middle East
2:17 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Morsi's Ouster In Egypt: A 'Bookend' For The Arab Spring

In Cairo on July 17, supporters of the ousted president demonstrate for his reinstatement.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

After covering the Egyptian revolution that overthrew President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, David Kirkpatrick has now been reporting on the military's ouster of Egypt's first democratically elected president, Mohammed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Kirkpatrick, The New York Times' Cairo bureau chief, arrived in Egypt in January 2011, and days later flew to Tunisia to cover the revolution that launched the Arab Spring.

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The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Missing Lynx? Cat Is On 'Brink Of Extinction,' Study Says

Two Iberian lynxes at a nature reserve in northern Spain. (February 2006 file photo.)
Victor Fraile Reuters /Landov

Already known as "the world's most endangered feline species," the Iberian lynx is headed to extinction in the wild within the next five decades, an international team of researchers warn in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Parallels
11:22 am
Mon July 22, 2013

They Can Hear You Now: The Global Surge In Cellphone Use

A woman uses her cellphone to record celebrations in Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 4.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:03 pm

The age of the traditional landline telephone is in rapid decline, as NPR's Dan Bobkoff reports on today's All Things Considered.

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