World

Afghanistan
4:13 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Some Afghans Worried As NATO Withdrawal Deadline Nears

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:16 pm

It's been a bad month in U.S.-Afghan relations and efforts to negotiate a long-term security pact have been sidelined by a series of controversies and rhetorical bombshells. As the end of the NATO mission creeps closer, Afghans are increasingly worried that the bad atmospherics between Washington and Kabul could leave the Afghan people without enough U.S. support and vulnerable to predatory neighbors.

Middle East
4:13 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Dempsey Wary Of U.S. Involvement In Syria

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:16 pm

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Martin Dempsey, has outlined the costs and benefits of the military options the U.S. is considering for Syria. The options include training rebels, military strikes and establishing a no-fly-zone. Dempsey offered his assessment in a letter to the top Senator on the Armed Services Committee. He noted there would be "unintended consequences" to any action, a reference to the past decade of military action in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Asia
4:13 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Families Of Poisoned Children Try To Cope In India

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:16 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In India, police have widened their hunt for the principal of an elementary school. It's the place where 23 children died last week after eating a toxic school lunch. The principal has been missing, along with her husband, since the day the children fell sick. An arrest warrant has been issued for her. In the meantime, parents of the victims are trying to cope with the tragedy. NPR's Julie McCarthy visited some of the families who live in one of India's poorest states.

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The Two-Way
12:14 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

PHOTO: Japanese Commuters Tilt Train To Free Trapped Woman

When a woman slipped between a train and a station platform just north of Tokyo on Monday, about 40 commuters and railroad employees worked together to tilt the 32-ton subway car enough to one side so that she could be pulled to safety.

The Associated Press writes that the train car's suspension system "allows it to lean to either side, according to the Yomiuri newspaper, Japan's largest daily."

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

No-Fly Zone In Syria Could Cost $1B A Month, U.S. General Says

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:54 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': The World Food Program's Muhannad Hadi talks about the crisis in Syria

On the heels of another deadly day in Syria — where about 100,000 people have died in the past two years and several million more have been displaced by battles between government forces and those trying to topple President Bashar Assad's regime — we're getting a look at what the USA's top general thinks about the options available to the U.S. for intervening militarily.

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All Tech Considered
9:24 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Giving Brightest Kids The 'Cram School' Experience, Online

With Brilliant.org, students around the world can get challenged with high-level concepts and problems.
Eric Cabanis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 2:54 pm

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Parallels
7:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

An Afghan Minister Fires Back At Impeachment Attempt

Ghulam Mujtaba Patang speaks at a news conference Monday after being dismissed from his post as Afghanistan's interior minister. He will stay in the post until the country's Supreme Court rules on the legality of his dismissal.
Mohammad Ismail Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 11:13 am

If you think it's tough being a Cabinet secretary in the U.S., having to deal with the demands of a fiercely partisan Congress and testify a few times a year, try being the Afghan interior minister.

"I have been summoned by the lower house 93 times, and 79 times by the upper house," says Ghulam Mujtaba Patang, who for the past 10 months has been in charge of the ministry that oversees the Afghan National Police.

"Based on this calculation, I have had one day in a week to work for the people," he says.

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Parallels
6:47 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Which Nations Hate The U.S.? Often Those Receiving U.S. Aid

A protester denounces President Obama during a march near Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 7. Bitter rivals in Egypt tend to be united in opposition to the U.S. government, which has been a leading aid donor to the country for decades.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 8:28 am

To figure out which countries dislike the U.S., one quick way is to simply look at which ones are getting the largest dollops of U.S. aid.

This wasn't the focus of a recent survey by the Pew Research Center. But it did emerge when Pew spoke to people in 39 countries about the U.S. and China, asking respondents if they had a favorable view of these two countries.

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Parallels
3:02 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Despite Many Threats, Afghan TV Satire Mocks The Powerful

Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, makes fun of government officials and other powerful figures in Afghanistan. Cast members are shown performing a skit during a taping of the show.
Sultan Faizy NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:10 pm

Saturday Night Live. The Daily Show. Zang-e-Khatar.

OK, maybe you haven't heard of that last one. But the comedy-sketch television show is well known in Afghanistan, where Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, is one of the most watched programs.

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Parallels
5:37 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

'Burqa Ban' Sparks Another Round Of Clashes In France

A Muslim woman walks in a Paris suburb where protesters clashed with police over the weekend. The demonstrators oppose the way the police have enforced a ban on Islamic face veils. Five people were injured and six detained in the unrest.
Olivier Corsan Maxppp/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 9:02 pm

France's ban on face coverings — the so-called burqa ban — has been the law since 2011, but it's still a sensitive topic.

The latest round of unrest began Friday when police officers asked a woman wearing a head-to-toe veil to lift the garment and show her face.

Authorities say the woman's husband attacked the police officer. Muslim groups say the police were disrespectful. The man was eventually arrested, which sparked protests that degenerated into violence.

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