World

Parallels
10:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

In Damascus, Anxiety, School Shopping And Soldiers Everywhere

Syrian boys walk on the rubble of a building in Damascus that was hit by what activists said was shelling by government forces. The threat of a possible U.S. strike has added to the sense of unease in the Syrian capital.
Bassam Khabieh Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 1:29 pm

The author is a Syrian citizen in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

A threatened U.S. military strike against Syria, now on hold, has left much of Damascus in limbo, filled with unease and uncertainty.

Since President Obama said that the Syrian government must be punished for allegedly using chemical weapons against its civilians, the capital has turned into one huge military barracks.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:49 am
Wed September 4, 2013

'I Always Reserve The Right' To Act, Obama Says Of Syria

President Obama during his news conference Wednesday in Stockholm.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:08 pm

Although he says he did not ask Congress to authorize the use of force against Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime "as a symbolic gesture," President Obama reiterated Wednesday that "I always reserve the right and responsibility to act on behalf of America's national security."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:39 am
Wed September 4, 2013

In Europe, Obama Will Seek Support For Syria Strike

President Obama as he emerged from Air Force One early Wednesday in Stockholm.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:49 am

President Obama landed in Sweden on Wednesday — the start of a European trip that will take him to Russia for a summit of world leaders at which he'll try to build support for his plan to strike targets inside Syria.

As The Washington Post says, it's a "high-stakes trip ... that could show whether the United States has broad international backing for action."

Read more
Middle East
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

How Concern For Israel's Security Enters Into Syria Plan

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 10:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Israel and the U.S. conducted a defense missile test over the Mediterranean Sea yesterday, not - the Pentagon quickly said - related to a possible U.S. strike on Syria.

Still, the joint test raised questions about American-Israeli coordination on Syria, and how Israel security factors into the administration's plans. Of course, Israel's biggest worry, by far, involves another country in the region, Iran, and the possibility it will get a nuclear bomb.

Read more
Europe
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

French Parliament To Debate U.S.-Led Strikes In Syria

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Francois Hollande, the president of France, says his country will join in any U.S.-led strikes in Syria. The French parliament is set to take up that issue today. Unlike Britain, which ruled out military action, and the U.S. Congress where President Obama still has to win the votes, it seems like parliament probably should provide very little trouble for Hollande. His party dominates there.

So let's go to NPR's Eleanor Beardsley. She's in Paris, and she's following this story. Hi, Eleanor.

Read more
World
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Congress Should Examine Fine Print When Voting On Syria

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And as Congress prepares to vote on authorizing force, Yale Law Professor Stephen L. Carter has some advice.

STEPHEN L. CARTER: The one thing I would strongly recommend is that members of Congress actually read the resolution before deciding whether to vote for it or not.

MONTAGNE: He says it's hard to approve of a president waging war while still limiting the power the president is given.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Middle East
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Obama Considers Training Options For Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama has promised limited military action against Syria. He says missile strikes are not about regime change and there will be no boots on the ground. But even as the Congress debates the president's plans for action, the White House is looking at broader options.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports the president may call on the U.S. military to help build up the Syrian opposition.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:52 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

What If Congress Votes 'No' On Syria?

President Obama attends a White House meeting on Syria Tuesday with congressional leaders.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 7:30 pm

With Republican House leaders lining up behind President Obama's planned U.S. military strike on Syria, the chances for congressional authorization seemed higher on Tuesday than they did over the weekend.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:10 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

5 Years After Being Covered With Water, Chinese Village Emerges

A July photo shows houses that have emerged from Tangjiashan Barrier Lake in Xuanping Township, in southwest China's Sichuan Province.
Liu Huawei Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:11 pm

It's been a long time since the people who lived in rural Xuanping saw their little town, which was flooded by a powerful earthquake in 2008. But thanks to a steep drop in water levels, parts of their village in China's Sichuan Province are visible again, from homes and businesses to its school.

The village's ghostly return began in July, when water levels fell from 712 meters to 703 meters above sea level — a difference of nearly 30 feet, as news site China Daily Asia reported.

Read more
World
5:04 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

A Look Back At A Predicted 'Clash Of Civilizations'

It was 20 years ago that Samuel Huntington's essay on what he termed "the clash of civilizations" was first published in the journal Foreign Affairs. The essay predicted the next frontier of global conflict would occur along cultural cleavages — most prominently between the Islamic world and the West. Foreign Affairs editor Gideon Rose and Robert Siegel discuss how perceptions of the essay have changed over time.

Pages