World

The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Chinese Astronauts Dock With Orbiting Space Lab

Chinese astronauts (from left) Wang Yaping, mission commander Nie Haisheng and Zhang Xiaoguang gesture as they prepare to board the Shenzhou-10 spacecraft in Jiuquan, China, on Tuesday.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 1:54 pm

A trio of Chinese astronauts has successfully docked with the Tiangong-1 space laboratory for what's expected to be a total of 15 days in orbit — the longest mission to date for China's burgeoning manned space program.

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The Salt
12:59 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Israel's Rabbis Seek To Bend Pastries To Their Will

What's what? In Israel, the shape of a boureka pastry traditionally tells you what's inside. Now the country's chief rabbis want the shapes to get a lot more specific to help people keep kosher.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 8:18 am

Anyone who follows a particular diet knows the challenge of eating out. How do you know exactly what's in the food?

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World
11:54 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Mau Mau Settlement: How Much Cash Fixes The Past?

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:55 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Turkey's Prime Minister Issues Warning To 'Lawbreakers'

A protestor with a gas mask uses a mobile phone to read the news on social media as demonstrators gather at midnight Thursday in Istanbul's Taksim Gezi Park.
Ozan Kose AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:01 am

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan issued a strong warning to the protesters camped out at Taksim Square in Istanbul.

He said that within 24 hours, the situation at the square would be resolved. As The New York Times reports, the tough talk was tempered with an olive branch of sorts: Erdogan hinted that a referendum could decide whether a mall would be built in place of a park next to the square.

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Parallels
6:02 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Iran's Election May Not Really Be About Picking A President

Female supporters of Iranian presidential candidate Saeed Jalili, Iran's top nuclear negotiator, hold up posters and national flags at a campaign rally in Tehran, Iran, on May 24. Jalili advocates for traditional roles for women and resistance against the U.S.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:55 am

When Iranians vote Friday for president, it will be an election unlike any other.

Clerics who hold supreme power in the Islamic Republic have allowed elections for decades.

But while the people vote, clerics and their allies make the rules. Those already in power choose who can run for office and limit what they do if elected.

Restrictions are tighter than ever after massive protests that followed a disputed election in 2009. In fact, the country has come to redefine the whole purpose of an election.

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Parallels
4:28 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Once Home To A Dreaded Drug Lord, Medellin Remakes Itself

Colombian army soldiers patrol Medellin's Loma de Cristobal neighborhood after warring gangs forced dozens of families to flee. Medellin used to be the most dangerous city in the world, but officials embarked on innovative projects designed to make life better in tough neighborhoods.
Paul Smith for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:03 pm

Of all the violent cities of Latin America, one stands out as a great success story: Medellin, a metropolis nestled in the mountains of northwest Colombia.

Once the home of the cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar, it recorded more than 6,300 homicides in 1991, making it the world's murder capital. Then, one city government after another built schools and libraries, parks and infrastructure. The police also received an overhaul and became more adept at going after violent trafficking groups.

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The Two-Way
5:46 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Egyptian Author Sentenced To Prison For Book 'Where Is God?'

Egyptian author and human rights activist Karam Saber has been sentenced to five years in prison, after a court found his writings to have insulted religion, reports the Egyptian news website Aswat Masriya.

The complaint against Saber and his book Ayn Allah (Where Is God?) was initially filed in 2011, months after the fall of former president Hosni Mubarak's regime. Saber's was reportedly the first blasphemy case of its kind after Egypt's revolution.

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The Two-Way
4:56 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

'Now What?': Greeks Confront Shutting Of Public Broadcaster

Protesters wave flags outside the Athens headquarters of broadcaster ERT on Wednesday. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras shut down the network Tuesday, but workers are occupying the building.
Petros Giannakouris AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:06 am

The Greek government has abruptly shut down the country's public broadcasting network and fired all of its staff.

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras wants to show the country's creditors, including the European Union and International Monetary Fund, that he's downsizing the public sector, which has been criticized for corruption and bloat. But many Greeks see the rushed closure as a dictatorial move that will compromise the country's troubled media.

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Middle East
4:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Protesters Back In Taksim Square After Being Driven Out

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

In Istanbul, crowds of protesters are once again gathering at Taksim Square, after being driven out last night by riot police.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING PROTESTERS)

BLOCK: Everywhere is Taksim, they chanted today, everywhere is resistance.

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Parallels
12:53 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Iranian Women: New President Could Bring More Restrictions

An Iranian woman walks past posters of presidential candidate Hasan Rowhani, a former top nuclear negotiator, next to his campaign headquarters, in Tehran, Iran, on June 1. Many Iranian women are concerned about the erosion of their opportunities.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 2:00 pm

As Iran prepares to hold a presidential election Friday, many women say that their limited gains have been rolled back by the outgoing president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Since all of the presidential candidates have been officially approved by Iran's clerical leaders, women say most are conservative and would be likely to continue adopting policies that target the social and educational advances by women.

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