World

Middle East
5:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Turmoil In Egypt: Getting 'Back From The Brink'

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 5:47 pm

Amid violence in Egypt, there are reportedly calls for dismantling the Muslim Brotherhood, the party of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. Guest host Don Gonyea speaks with Shadi Hamid, the director of research for the Brookings Doha Center, about political and security issues in the country.

Middle East
5:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Egypt Continues To Slip Further Into Chaos, Violence

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 5:47 pm

Security forces cleared a central Cairo Mosque Saturday, where hundreds of supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi had gathered overnight. Hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood supporters have been arrested, charged with murder and terrorism. Guest host Don Gonyea speaks with NPR's Peter Kenyon about the ongoing crisis.

Parallels
2:18 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Muslim Brotherhood: A Force Throughout The Muslim World

Crowds gather around the burning headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo on Oct. 27, 1954. The building was set on fire following the attempted assassination of President Gamal Abdel Nasser.
AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 4:10 pm

The Muslim Brotherhood, which has a presence in dozens of Muslim countries, has been banned, repressed or restricted for much of its more than eight-decade history in Egypt, the place where it was born.

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NPR Story
10:42 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Gunfire Exchanged In Standoff At Cairo Mosque

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And this week, Egypt witnessed the bloodiest day in its modern history. More than 600 people were killed, most are in a security crackdown on supporters of the ousted president, Mohamed Morsi. And it isn't over. Dozens more people have died since, some in citizen on citizen violence.

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Sat August 17, 2013

NASA: Meteor In Russia Threw Up Globe-Girdling Plume Of Debris

A meteor trail is seen above a residential apartment block in the Urals city of Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 8:19 pm

The bus-sized meteor that slammed into Russia in February, causing a massive shock-wave and injuring hundreds of people, sent a plume of dust into the stratosphere that circled the globe in just four days and lingered for months, NASA says.

The Feb. 15 meteor at Chelyabinsk near Russia's southern border with Kazakhstan measured 60 feet across and weighed 12,000 tons. It detonated 15 miles above the city.

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The Two-Way
8:13 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Dozens Dead, 'Huge' Number Missing In Philippine Ferry Sinking

A survivor cries as she arrives at hospital in Cebu after a ferry collided with a cargo ship in Cebu, central Philippines on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:22 am

More than 30 people died and nearly 175 reportedly remained missing after a ferry collided with a cargo vessel and sank in the central Philippines.

Reuters reports that a gaping hole was left in the bow of the cargo ship after the collision with the ferry, MV Thomas Aquinas, on Friday near the country's second-largest city of Cebu:

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Europe
7:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Eurozone Rebound: Blip Or Trend?

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Earlier this week, the eurozone emerged from an 18-month long recession. The trading bloc's gross domestic product grew by 0.3 percent in the second quarter of this year but is one good quarter a blip or a trend and will it have any impact on the U.S. economy?

Simon Johnson is a professor at MIT and former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund. He joins us in the studios. Thanks very much.

SIMON JOHNSON: Thanks for having me.

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Middle East
7:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Despite Bloodshed, Many Egyptians Support Military

A pro-Morsi supporter stands with other demonstrators in Cairo's Abbassiya neighborhood on Friday.
Mohammed Abdel Moneim AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:16 am

Egypt witnessed the bloodiest day in its modern history this week. More than 600 people were killed, most during a security crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

And it isn't over. Dozens more have died since, some in citizen-on-citizen violence. A standoff is going on at a central Cairo mosque, and the nation is spiraling out of control.

Much of Egypt has little sympathy for Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood or their supporters.

'For The Good Of Egypt'

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Asia
6:02 am
Sat August 17, 2013

To Care For U.S. Kids, Filipinas Leave Their Own Behind

Lita and her son, Myke, now live in Houston together. She still works as a nanny and Myke is an interior designer. Lita's two daughters have also immigrated to the United States.
Ashley Westerman For NPR

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 4:53 pm

Few American mothers could fathom a situation that would force them to leave their country in order to put food in their children's bellies, clothes on their backs and send them to school. This is the reality for many Filipina women, who cross oceans in search of jobs that pay enough to provide for their families back home.

The Philippines is known worldwide for sending its citizens overseas to work, and a recent study has shown the country consistently deploys more women than men. In the United States, Filipinas are often nurses and caretakers; many work as nannies

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The Two-Way
7:04 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Kyrgyz Officials Shut Down Alcohol-Smuggling Pipeline

A new pipeline between the Central Asian republics of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan was until recently pumping away. Not oil, though — moonshine.

Customs and border officials in Kyrgyzstan uncovered the "makeshift underwater pipeline" on the bed of the Chu River, which divides the two countries. Officials think smugglers have sent thousands of liters of grain alcohol through the conduit from Kazakhstan.

The BBC writes:

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