World

Business
4:50 am
Mon December 2, 2013

Russian Companies Fret Over Cost Of Sochi Games

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 1:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In just a couple of months, the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi will host the Winter Olympics. Russia is reportedly spending nearly $50 billion on those games, which would be an Olympic record. To finance venues and housing, one of Russia's state-owned banks lent about $7.5 billion to an elite group of industrialists who are helping bankroll the games. Now, those investors are getting a little nervous.

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Iraq
6:00 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

A Soldier Accused, But Few Answers In Death Of Iraqi Teens

Last month, military investigators began a process to charge Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael Barbera in the 2007 fatal shooting of two deaf, unarmed Iraqi youths.
Mario Tama AP

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 7:55 pm

It sounds unthinkable, but there are times, according to the rules of war, when it's morally acceptable to shoot a child.

A 12-year-old can, of course, fire an AK-47, but the more gut-wrenching decisions revolve around ambiguous situations. Could a child with a cell phone be a lookout for insurgents or send a detonation signal to an IED bomb?

These were the types of scenarios our soldiers had to face in Iraq. Countless soldiers have returned haunted by civilians they killed because the civilians panicked and ran through a checkpoint or reached for something too quickly.

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The Sunday Conversation
8:13 am
Sun December 1, 2013

In Gujarat, Anti-Muslim Legacy Of 2002 Riots Still Looms

Zahir Janmohamed on his terrace in Juhapura, in the Muslim ghetto of Ahmedabad.
Miranda Kennedy NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

The U.S. Congress doesn't usually weigh in on domestic politics in other countries, but a resolution recently introduced in Congress by Rep. Keith Ellison is designed to put pressure on Narendra Modi, the front-runner to be India's next prime minister.

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Middle East
8:13 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Palestinian Refugees On Losing Side Of UN Budget Crunch

Palestinian refugee Lawahez Burghal stuffs tripe with rice and garbanzo beans for her family in their home in the Amari refugee camp in the West Bank. Many refugees still depend on the United Nations for food, health care and education.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 8:17 am

The United Nations agency that provides basic health care and education to Palestinian refugees doesn't have enough money to pay local salaries this month.

The shortfall could directly affect 30,000 teachers, doctors and social workers, as well as the people using their services in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and the Palestinian territories.

Filling Basic Needs

Sit for an hour in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency office in the al-Amari camp for Palestinian refugees, and you get a sense of what people expect the agency to provide.

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Parallels
5:24 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Five Things You May Not Know About Child Marriage

Arinafe Makwiti, 13, says her parents forced her to drop out of school and get married to an older man last year to help with the family finances. Makwiti has divorced her husband, but now has a 9-month-old daughter.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 10:40 am

NPR's Jennifer Ludden recently traveled to the African nation of Malawi, one of many countries in the developing world where child marriage remains prevalent. She found girls like Christina Asima, who was married at 12 and became a mother at 13. She is now divorced and caring for her infant son on her own. You can read Jennifer's full report here. Below are a few more things she learned while reporting on child marriage.

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Parallels
2:40 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Restoring The Mausoleum That Helped Inspire The Taj Mahal

Elaborate scaffolding was erected to complete the work on the exterior of Humayun's Tomb.
Courtesy of the AKTC

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Think Taj Mahal and then try to imagine what came before it. What was the inspiration for that masterpiece?

Archaeologists and architects say a 16th century tomb tucked in the southeast corner of Delhi presaged the jewel of Muslim art in India.

The recent restoration of the mausoleum built to memorialize the Muslim emperor Humayun has created a sensation in the city, drawing sightseers, schoolchildren and history buffs to the site that is now a showcase for India's architectural patrimony.

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Parallels
12:27 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Rival Protesters Clash In Bangkok

Anti-government protesters in Bangkok attack a bus that they suspect is of supporters of the current Thai government on Saturday.
Wason Wanichakorn AP

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 1:26 pm

Clashes among protesters in Thailand's capital have led to the death of at least one person amid mass rallies by opponents of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra as well as by supporters of her government.

Reuters says the person was shot dead and that 10 others were wounded in the first bloodshed in a week of protests aimed at toppling Yingluck, whose government won overwhelmingly in 2011 elections.

In other violence, Reuters reports,

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Religion
5:18 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

New Pope's 'Dream' Includes Tolerance, Compassion And Tradition

This week, Pope Francis released a new document called the "Evangelii Gaudium" (The Joy of the Gospel). His first major document has captured the attention of Vatican watchers, who describe a vision statement of what Francis sees for the future of the Catholic Church.

World
5:16 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Thousands Of Children As Young As 6 Work In Bolivia's Mines

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Remember those Chilean miners who spent more than two months trapped underground? What if I told you they were the lucky ones?

Many miners in South America work in conditions far more dangerous, and some of them are as young as 6 years old. Their daily travails would shock Charles Dickens. But now, some children in Bolivia are unionizing and asking the government to lower the working age.

Wes Enzinna went into the mines in the city of Potosi to understand why. And he writes about the experience for VICE magazine.

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World
5:15 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Nairobi Seeks Answers 2 Months After 'Kenya's 9/11'

On Sept. 21, terrorists attacked the upscale Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, killing at least 67 people. Despite early reports of as many as 15 gunmen, Kenyan police now know that the attack was the work of only four terrorist, all of whom died in the suicide mission. But some other very important questions remain unanswered.

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