World

Middle East
1:50 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

In Benghazi, U.S. Intelligence Wasn't Focused On 'Homegrown Militants'

New York Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick." href="/post/benghazi-us-intelligence-wasnt-focused-homegrown-militants" class="noexit lightbox">
A vehicle inside the U.S. Consulate compound in Benghazi is engulfed in flames after an attack on Sept. 11, 2012. "There is no evidence whatsoever that al-Qaida or any group linked to al-Qaida played a role in organizing or leading the attack," says New York Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 5:14 pm

On Sept. 11, 2012, an attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. Who led this attack and why have been the subject of much controversy in Washington. Republicans have charged that the Obama administration and Hillary Clinton's State Department were at fault for not stopping what the Republicans claim was a carefully planned attack by international terrorists, including al-Qaida.

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Parallels
1:32 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Crimea: 3 Things To Know About Ukraine's Latest Hot Spot

Crimea. It's no longer a day at the beach.
Oleg Nikishin Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 8:47 am

The unrest in Ukraine has now shifted eastward to Crimea. The region is an autonomous part of Ukraine, but with strong emotional ties to Russia and a majority of people who identify themselves as Russian.

Here is why Crimea is important to both Russia and Ukraine.

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Parallels
1:10 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Searching For The Remains Of Egypt's Revolution

Clashes break out between rival Egyptian groups near Cairo's Tahrir square, on Jan. 25, 2014. The day marked the third anniversary of the uprising that toppled former ruler Hosni Mubarak, but the military is back in control in Egypt.
Khaled Kamel AFP/Getty Images

Just three years after protesters and the Egyptian military drove Hosni Mubarak from power, the revolution hasn't delivered what many Egyptians expected, and hopes are fading that it ever will.

Military commander Abdel Fattah al-Sisi is widely expected to announce his candidacy for president any day now. The charismatic strongman would be the frontrunner and his candidacy would be a landmark in the ongoing military crackdown now restricting many of the freedoms Egyptians hoped for when toppling Mubarak.

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Africa
12:59 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Ugandan Gay Activist: President Will Have No Problem Putting Me In Jail

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 8:56 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This week, we've been taking a look at proposed new laws, both here and overseas, that affect LGBT people. Yesterday, we talked about a bill under consideration in Arizona that would allow business owners with religious objections to refuse to serve LGBT people.

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World
12:59 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Going 'Afro Global' For Black History Month

Michel Martin
Stephen Voss NPR

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 8:56 am

This year we decided to observe Black History Month by hearing from a wide variety of people with roots in Africa, who are changing the world, all over the world.

The series was produced by Tell Me More's Freddie Boswell. She joins us now to help us close the series, along with our Executive Producer Carline Watson.

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Latin America
6:18 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Mexican Judges Rule 'El Chapo' Will Stand Trial In Mexico First

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 7:43 am

The arrest of Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin Guzman is a coup for Mexican authorities. Now comes the tussle over where he will be tried. He's wanted in at least seven U.S. federal districts.

NPR Story
6:13 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Ukraine's Crimea Region Asks Russia For Protection

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 7:43 am

Millions of people in eastern Ukraine speak Russian as their first language. Russia's foreign minister complains about what he calls "neo-fascist sentiment" in western Ukraine.

NPR Story
5:09 am
Wed February 26, 2014

U.S. Response To Syria's Humanitarian Crisis Criticized

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 7:43 am

Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson describes the response to the Syrian crisis as "strategic despair." He and Michael Abramowitz of the Holocaust museum, tell Renee Montagne about what they saw.

NPR Story
5:09 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Obama Tells Pentagon To Plan A Full Afghan Departure

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 7:43 am

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign a security agreement that would keep U.S. troops in his country. Despite the pressure, Obama is giving Afghan officials more time to finish a deal.

Parallels
3:37 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Gays And Lesbians Seeking Asylum In U.S. May Find A Hard Road

Activists protest Uganda's anti-gay legislation in Nairobi, Kenya, this month. LGBT status has been grounds for asylum in the U.S. since 1994, but winning refugee status can be difficult, particularly for people who are unable to obtain visas to the U.S. before applying.
Dai Kurokawa EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 7:43 am

Even through a long-distance line from Uganda, you can hear the fear and anxiety in the young man's voice. Nathan, 19, is gay. NPR is not using his surname because he fears arrest.

"Right now we are not safe," he says. "Because we are hearing some people say ... 'If we get you, we will kill you. If we get you, we'll do something bad to you.' "

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