World

Shots - Health News
4:38 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Gene Sequencing Could One Day Make Malaria Easier To Treat

A health official takes a blood sample from a child's finger for a malaria test at a clinic in Bong Ti Lang village on the Thai-Myanmar border.
Narong Sangnak EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:30 pm

Malaria has proved one of the hardest diseases on the planet to treat. The World Health Organization estimates there are nearly 200 million cases each year, and the parasitic infection is blamed for some 700,000 deaths annually.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Russia Aborts Rocket Engine Sales, GPS Cooperation With U.S.

Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Antares rocket lifts off at Wallops Island, Va., in April of last year. The Antares uses a pair of Russian-made NK-33 rocket engines that Moscow says it will stop supplying for military launches.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 4:18 pm

In a tit-for-tat sanctions dispute over the situation in Ukraine, a top Russian official said Tuesday that Moscow would stop supplying the U.S. with rocket engines used in military satellite launches and suspend operation of GPS ground stations in Russian territory.

The moves come after Washington banned some high-tech equipment sales to Russia as part of sanctions in response to the annexation of Crimea.

Read more
Middle East
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Frustrations Defeat Another Diplomat, As U.N. Syria Envoy Quits

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The conflict in Syria now in its 4th year, and a diplomatic solution seems as far off as ever. The international diplomat who's been trying to lead negotiations announced he's stepping down. It's a new sign of just how bad things are Syria. And as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, there doesn't seem to be a plan B.

Read more
Law
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

EU Court Tells Google That People Have 'The Right To Be Forgotten'

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Europe's highest court has issued a landmark decision against Google, ruling that people can go directly to Google and request that the search engine delete certain results about them. For more information, Audie Cornish turns to Meg Ambrose, a professor of communication, culture, and technology at Georgetown University.

Middle East
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

In Return To Old City, Syrian Civilians Find Homs In Devastation

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 6:53 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
The Salt
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Ranchers Wary As U.S. Considers Brazilian Beef Imports

Cattle rancher Sharon Harvat says she's worried about how the Brazilian beef imports will impact her business.
Luke Runyon NPR

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 8:25 pm

Sharon Harvat drives a blue pickup truck through a field of several hundred pregnant heifers on her property outside Scottsbluff in western Nebraska. Harvat and her husband run their cattle in the Nebraska panhandle during the winter, then back to northern Colorado after the calves are born.

Harvat says when she heard about a proposal to open up the beef trade with Brazil, she felt a pit in her stomach.

"On an operation like ours, where we travel a lot with our cattle, that would probably come to an abrupt halt if there was an outbreak," she says.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

International Aviation Agency Says Aircraft Tracking Is A Priority

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 3:50 pm

An international aviation organization is taking a first step toward implementing a system that would track aircraft globally.

The Globe and Mail reports that after a two-day meeting in Montreal, the United Nations' International Civil Aviation Organization said that the tracking system would be "pursued as a matter of priority."

Read more
The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Australian Government Plans To Slash Budget, Raise Taxes

Australia's Finance Minister Mathias Cormann (right) speaks at a news conference as Treasurer Joe Hockey looks on in Canberra on Tuesday.
Madeleine Coorey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 5:42 pm

Australia's conservative government says it wants to effect radical spending cuts and tax increases aimed at nearly halving the fiscal deficit by 2016.

In a speech to Parliament, Treasurer Joe Hockney said Tuesday that "the age of entitlement is over."

Read more
Parallels
2:48 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Iraq Debates Law That Would Allow Men To Marry 9-Year-Old Girls

An Iraqi schoolgirl passes a banner supporting a proposal that, among other things, would allow men to marry girls as young as 9. Opponents say it would mark a major setback for women and children. The Arabic on the banner reads: "The Jaafari Personal Status Law saves my rights and my dignity."
Karim Kadim AP

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

A stroll through the Baghdad Book Fair last month was a lesson in today's cultural norms in Iraq. The books — gold-embossed, neatly arrayed — were almost all religious, and most of the customers were men.

But in the middle of the white pavilion, a woman's voice rang out loud and strong. Fawzia al-Babakhan, a lawyer, delivered a blistering critique of a proposed law that would rewrite the rules for matters such as marriage and inheritance according to Shiite Islamic law.

Read more
Parallels
11:48 am
Tue May 13, 2014

China's Communist Party Learns The Fine Art Of Public Relations

Among other courses, the China Executive Leadership Academy in Shanghai teaches public relations to government officials, including mock TV shows and mock press conferences. NPR's Frank Langfitt took this photo from a control room, because the presence of a foreign reporter in class rattled some of the participants.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Openness doesn't come naturally to China's Communist Party. After all, China is an authoritarian state where people have little right to know how they are governed. But Communist Party schools have been trying to change that over the years by teaching officials how to deal with the news media.

Earlier this month, Qin Chang, a host at Shanghai People's Radio, taught a class on the art of the press conference at China Executive Leadership Academy in Shanghai's sprawling Pudong district and I was invited to watch.

Read more

Pages