World

Goats and Soda
1:22 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago

Now that's a big root: Sweet potatoes aren't tubers, or thickened stems, like potatoes. Sweet potatoes are roots — swollen and packed with starch.
U-ichiro Murakami Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 2:51 pm

The first genetically modified crop wasn't made by a megacorporation. Or a college scientist trying to design a more durable tomato. Nope. Nature did it — at least 8,000 years ago.

Well, actually bacteria in the soil were the engineers. And the microbe's handiwork is present in sweet potatoes all around the world today.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

New Fighting Along Yemen Border Closes Schools And Airports

An airport official walks past a military aircraft destroyed by Saudi-led airstrikes, at the Sanaa International airport in Yemen on Tuesday. Destroyed runways prevent aid from being delivered.
Hani Mohammed AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 4:05 pm

The fighting in Yemen has expanded from the major cities and ports to a border region with Saudi Arabia. Shelling by Shiite Houthi rebels in the area of Najran in northwestern Yemen has forced Saudi Arabia to suspend school and halt flights into the local airports, according to news reports.

This latest flashpoint comes nearly six weeks into a Saudi-led air campaign to stop the Houthis and their allies, security forces loyal to ousted President Ali Abdullah Saleh, from taking control of Yemen.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Tue May 5, 2015

ISIS Claims Credit For Shooting In Garland, Texas

An FBI crime scene investigator documents evidence outside the Curtis Culwell Center on Monday in Garland, Texas.
Brandon Wade AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 11:05 am

The self-declared Islamic State is taking credit for a thwarted attack on a contest to draw the Prophet Muhammad in Garland, Texas.

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The Two-Way
6:12 am
Tue May 5, 2015

NYU Student Detained In North Korea Was Hoping For 'Great Event'

A screen grab from Joo Won-moon's interview with CNN from Pyongyang on Tuesday.
CNN

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 9:45 pm

New York University student Joo Won-moon, who's a South Korean citizen, says he's healthy and being treated well in North Korean custody, according to an interview he gave CNN on Tuesday.

Joo, 21, acknowledged he crossed the border into North Korea illegally, out of hopes for a "great event" to help strengthen ties between diplomatic rivals North and South Korea.

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Asia
5:34 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Protesters Park On Karachi's Press Club Sidewalk Waiting To Be Heard

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 7:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In the United States, voicing a strong opinion can get you denounce on Twitter. In Pakistan, voicing a strong opinion can get you killed.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Europe
5:02 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Relentless Flow Of Migrants Causes Alarm In Italy

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 2:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
5:02 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Skeletal Horse On Trafalgar Square's 4th Plinth Is Art And A Stock Ticker

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
5:02 am
Tue May 5, 2015

From Israel To ISIS: How A Search For A Safe Haven Took A Wrong Turn

African migrants, many from Eritrea and Sudan, raise their hands as part of a protest at the Holot detention center in southern Israel on Feb. 17, 2014. Tesfai Kidane, an Eritrean who left the center last year and returned to Africa, was later killed by the Islamic State in Libya. It was not clear how he wound up in Libya.
Oded Balilty AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 4:37 pm

What happened to Tesfai Kidane?

The Eritrean migrant came to a tragic end in Libya at the hands of the Islamic State, but his family isn't sure what path he took to get there or exactly where he was headed. At a time when unstable states are creating floods of refugees in the Middle East and North Africa, Kidane's tale is just one of many filled with random twists and turns and unexpected outcomes.

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Goats and Soda
7:03 pm
Mon May 4, 2015

The World's Mothers Don't Always Get The Care They Need

When Dr. Bina Valsangkar had a miscarriage in India, she received state-of-the-art medical care. But just a few miles from the hospital she visited, nurses were struggling to keep up with sick patients.
Courtesy of Save the Children

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 8:51 pm

Two months into my first pregnancy, I suffered a miscarriage and needed to seek medical care.

Although a miscarriage is difficult for any woman to experience, I had access to the best care. My physician was excellent, I trusted her judgment, and the imaging equipment, laboratory facilities and clinical care were all first-rate.

That's not surprising — except that I was then living in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, the capital city of one of India's poorest states.

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Parallels
5:47 pm
Mon May 4, 2015

Replica Of Lafayette's Ship Re-Creates Historic Voyage To America

The Marquis de Lafayette sailed across the Atlantic to America aboard the original Hermione in 1780 and joined the American rebels in their struggle for independence from Great Britain. This replica will retrace his voyage; it's scheduled to arrive in Yorktown, Va., on June 5.
Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 2:02 am

Hundreds of American towns, streets and parks are named after the Marquis de Lafayette — the French general who came in 1780 to help George Washington in the struggle for independence.

Now, an exact replica of the general's ship is sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, retracing Lafayette's voyage.

The magnificent "tall ship" is anchored in the waters off the coast of Fouras in western France. Its towering masts and 18th century rigging set it apart from any other boat out here.

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