Trade

Canadian Parliamentary Minister and NAFTA advisor Andrew Leslie addressed the World Affairs Council of Charlotte Thursday.
David Boraks / WFAE

Updated Friday, Jan. 26, 2018
President Trump has threatened to pull out of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, which he once called "the worst deal ever." As negotiations on the treaty continue this week, a top Canadian official visited Charlotte Thursday to argue that NAFTA actually is good for the US, Canada and Mexico - and for North Carolina.

Alex Olgin / WFAE News

Robotic arms coil 335 feet of steel wire into a roll four-and-a-half inches in diameter.  It is then dropped onto a conveyor belt. Where workers at Mar-Mac Wire in McBee, SC, package it into boxes.

Manufacturers are waiting to see if President Donald Trump follows through on threats to slap new import fees on U.S. companies with factories in Mexico. That includes Charlotte-based Nucor, the largest U.S. steelmaker, which says it’s moving ahead with a plant in central Mexico.  

Courtesy of the US Department of Commerce

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce made a stop in Charlotte Wednesday. She answered questions from business leaders and students at a symposium in uptown. It was an event sponsored by the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce. Before she took the stage she sat down to talk with WFAE’s Tom Bullock.

You may not think of Canada as a major player in Charlotte and North Carolina's economy. But North Carolina sells more goods to Canada than to any other foreign country in the world. And hundreds of thousands of North Carolina jobs depend on trade with Canada. Here in Charlotte, there are 71 Canadian firms operating and 10 US headquarters for Canadian companies. We'll be joined by the Canadian Ambassador to the US to talk about Charlotte and North Carolina's relationship with Canada, as well as the United States' close relationship with our neighbor to the north when it comes to defense, economy and trade, energy and the environment, when Charlotte Talks.