tax incentives

NC General Assembly

North Carolina’s new film grant program is just 72 days old. But already there are two bills aiming to change how much money the state can offer TV and movie productions in order to lure them to the state. 

Courtesy of the North Carolina Film Office

The director of North Carolina’s film commission is in Park City, Utah, to attend the annual Sundance Film Festival. He’s there to convince directors, producers and executives to shoot their productions in North Carolina. But it’s a hard sell due to the state’s scaled back film incentives program. 

Julie Rose

For months, Chiquita’s board has been spurning an offer to merge with financial company Safra and juice maker Cutrale. Monday, Chiquita announced it will take the buyout by the two Brazilian companies.

So what does this mean for Charlotte? 

Courtesy of the North Carolina Film Office

The TV show Banshee will stop filming in and around Charlotte. It looks to be the first casualty of North Carolina’s soon to expire film incentive tax credit.

For all of its three seasons Banshee, a campy show about an ex-con hiding out in an Amish community has called Charlotte home.

HBO, which produces Banshee for Cinemax, its sister network, has no official comment. But cast and crew for the show took to Twitter today to thank Charlotte and surrounding cities for being a good home for the program’s first three seasons.

Courtesy of EUE/Screen Gems

It’s been more than 24 hours since Speaker Thom Tillis and Senator Pro Tem Phil Berger announced a budget deal was all but done.

Senator Berger said the document would be printed – and published online for all to see late Tuesday night or sometime today.

That still hasn’t happened. Which means there are scant details on just how the General Assembly will pay for the teacher raises and other new spending they announced yesterday afternoon.

Courtesy of the Wilmington Film Commission

The curtain is poised to come crashing down on North Carolina’s film incentive.

Wednesday, the House Finance Committee adopted a plan which would slash the amount a production company could receive, from $20 million to five million.

Courtesy of EUE/Screen Gems

For the past seven years North Carolina has been aggressively trying to lure movie and television shows to film in the state. Their bait? Tax dollars.

Since the program began it has been hugely successful. But the film incentive program is controversial. In Raleigh there is a movement to change the program or let it sunset at the end of this year.

This week, we take a closer look at the incentives program and proposals to change it. This report looks at how the system works and how much money just one TV show spends in the state.

The film industry contributed $250 million in direct spending to the North Carolina economy this year, a dip from last year, according to a new estimate from the North Carolina Film Office.

The 2013 estimate would be about one-sixth less than the state’s more than $300 million record haul from the film industry last year. The director of the North Carolina Film Office points to a primary reason for the dip: Iron Man 3, the biggest blockbuster the state’s ever had, filmed last year.

Lincoln County, N.C.

Lincoln County’s economy is improving. Unemployment is down and incomes are up. But, that prosperity also means less state money can go toward luring new jobs. WFAE’s Duncan McFadyen explains.

Several years ago North Carolina lawmakers introduced a large tax incentive package that they hoped would lure the movie industry back to the state. By any anecdotal measure the incentive is a huge hit. Charlotte is home to several national shows and the region and state have seen some of the largest films in Hollywood come here for production. Millions and millions are spent in the state but critics say the numbers are not what they seem. So is the booming film industry in our state worth the incentive? We'll examine that question and look at a rapidly growing independent film industry in our state, when Charlotte Talks.