State Budget

NC General Assembly

The North Carolina House and Senate are far apart on their education budgets. State lawmakers have bought themselves another 45 days to come up with a state budget. But school districts have to start planning now for next school year and the uncertainty is making it hard. 

It’s already two weeks into the fiscal year and North Carolina’s budget is still up in the air. The state Senate today proposed a new compromise with House lawmakers that would offer eight percent average pay raises for teachers. That’s down from the Senate’s original eleven percent proposal. The House and Senate have also disagreed on Medicaid funding. It all means state agencies are currently spending money with caution. 

Lawmakers in Raleigh Wednesday took a major step in their budget negotiations.  A step backward.

If there was any sense of congeniality and cooperation at the state capitol it was not found in room 643, where House Senior Budget Chairman Nelson Dollar called to order select members of the House and Senate  to negotiate the now overdue state budget.

NC General Assembly

Earlier this month, we discussed some of the issues going on in the state legislature, but just barely scratched the surface in our discussion about taxes, Moral Mondays, and the negative national attention our state government is receiving these days. On this edition of Charlotte Talks, we'll gather political reporters and experts to talk about what's been going on since, in the final days of the legislative session. We'll cover the budget and some of the budget items that are raising eyebrows around the state like cuts in education and the closing of prisons around the state, and we'll talk about tax reform, the election bill, and Medicaid changes. Join us for that discussion, when Charlotte Talks.

Republicans in the North Carolina Senate have proposed a $20.6 billion budget for next year.  That’s essentially the same size as Governor Pat McCrory’s proposal. Spending in major categories would be mostly flat except for health and human services and natural and economic resources.  However, Medicaid spending would grow 11 percent compared to this year. 

The Senate’s Plan For Education

Charlotte Ranks Third In Nation For Funding Pensions

Jan 17, 2013
Briana Duggan

Charlotte is ranked third in the nation for paying its bills on time. Not just any bills – pension bills. That's according to a new report by The Pew Charitable Trusts. They found that the country's largest cities have an unpaid tab of more than $200 billion when it comes to retirement benefits promised to employees. And it turns out Charlotte has been preparing for retirement relatively well when it comes to pension plans.