Science & Environment

The Two-Way
5:48 pm
Fri May 8, 2015

At 13 Billion Light-Years Away, Galaxy Is Farthest To Be Measured From Earth

An image of the galaxy EGS-zs8-1, which set a new distance record after researchers determined it was more than 13 billion light-years away.
NASA, ESA, P. Oesch, and I. Momcheva, and the 3D-HST and HUDF09/XDF teams

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 5:57 pm

A new glimpse of what the universe looked like in its youth has been captured, thanks to researchers who determined that light from the galaxy known as EGS-zs8-1 has spent more than 13 billion years traveling to reach us here on Earth.

The blue galaxy, which was named for its coloration after its initial discovery by the Hubble telescope, was studied by a team of astronomers based at Yale University and the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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Environment
4:30 pm
Fri May 8, 2015

Global Carbon Dioxide Levels Reach Milestone

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 10:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Environment
3:49 am
Fri May 8, 2015

Landmark Conservation Deal Offers A First Glimpse Of New Wilderness

Hudson River view.
Brian Mann North Country Public Radio

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 8:22 am

Warm weather has finally arrived in the Northeast. And along a wild stretch of New York state's Hudson River in the Adirondack Mountains, a section has been opened to paddlers for the first time in decades.

New landmark conservation deals in New York state have protected vast swaths of wilderness. Those deals have also opened waterways that had been closed to the public for more than a century.

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Goats and Soda
8:58 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Scientists Crack A 50-Year-Old Mystery About The Measles Vaccine

Worth a little pain? Back in 1990, a school boy got a measles shot in the U.K., and it turns out, he got more than protection against the measles.
Photofusion UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 8:20 pm

Back in the 1960s, the U.S. started vaccinating kids for measles. As expected, children stopped getting measles.

But something else happened.

Childhood deaths from all infectious diseases plummeted. Even deaths from diseases like pneumonia and diarrhea were cut by half.

Scientists saw the same phenomenon when the vaccine came to England and parts of Europe. And they see it today when developing countries introduce the vaccine.

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The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

A Fish With Cancer Raises Questions About Health Of Susquehanna River

A smallmouth bass with confirmed malignant tumor was caught by an angler in the Susquehanna River near Duncannon, Pa., on Nov. 3, 2014.
John Arway Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:24 pm

Late last year, an angler caught a smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River near Duncannon, Pa. That fish, officials from the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission said this week, had a malignant tumor. It's the first time this type of tumor has been found on a smallmouth bass in the river, the agency says.

Cancerous growths and tumors on fish are "very, very infrequent," John Arway, the agency's executive director, said in an interview.

"These cancers can be initiated by contaminants," he said.

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Shots - Health News
4:59 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

DNA 'Printing' A Big Boon To Research, But Some Raise Concerns

Cambrian Genomics says that what it calls a DNA printer is essentially a DNA sorter — it quickly spots and collects the desired, tailored stretch of DNA.
Courtesy of Cambrian Genomics

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:21 pm

Here's something that might sound strange: There are companies now that print and sell DNA.

This trend — which uses the term "print" in the sense of making a bunch of copies speedily — is making particular stretches of DNA much cheaper and easier to obtain than ever before. That excites many scientists who are keen to use these tailored strings of genetic instructions to do all sorts of things, ranging from finding new medical treatments to genetically engineering better crops.

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Around the Nation
4:30 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 6:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Animals
4:30 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

At Long Last, Taxidermied Hyenas In Chicago Get Their Own Diorama

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:13 pm

After years tucked away in the Reptile Hall at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, four striped taxidermied hyenas are finally getting their own diorama.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:56 am
Thu May 7, 2015

Colorado Water Plan Aims To Head Off Predicted Shortages Down The Road

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:58 am

Copyright 2015 Colorado Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.cpr.org.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In the 19th century, before Americans fully settled the West, some called it the Great American Desert. It wasn't considered fertile enough to develop.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
8:17 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Fla. Governor Leaves Meeting With U.S. Health Secretary Empty-Handed

Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks Wednesday with reporters in Washington, D.C., after a meeting with Sylvia Burwell, head of the Department of Health and Human Services.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 8:48 am

Florida Gov. Rick Scott paid a high-stakes visit to Washington D.C. on Wednesday, in hopes of persuading the Obama administration to continue a program that sends more than $1 billion in federal funds to Florida each year to help reimburse hospitals for the costs of caring for the state's poor. Uncertainty about the future of the program, slated to end June 30, has created a hole in the state budget and paralyzed Florida's legislature.

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