Science & Environment

TED Radio Hour
9:30 am
Fri July 17, 2015

What's Disappearing From the Amazon — Even Faster Than Wildlife?

"There's a saying in Suriname that I dearly love: 'The rainforests hold answers to questions we have yet to ask.' But as you all know, it's rapidly disappearing."--Mark Plotkin
Ryan Lash TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Finite.

About Mark Plotkin's TED Talk

The isolated tribes of the Amazon are getting dispersed or dying out. Ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin describes what we'll lose if their culture and collective wisdom vanish with them.

About Mark Plotkin

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TED Radio Hour
9:30 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Can Limited Resources Lead To Better Innovation?

"When you put a limitation on resources, you remove the limitation on creativity because necessity is the mother of invention."--Navi Radjou
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 12:59 pm

Part 5 of TED Radio Hour episode Finite.

About Navi Radjou's TED Talk

Navi Radjou has spent years studying "jugaad," also known as frugal innovation. While researching emerging markets, he realized that creativity might be the most precious renewable resource.

About Navi Radjou

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TED Radio Hour
9:30 am
Fri July 17, 2015

What Can A Small Town In England Teach Us About Resilience?

"Our degree of oil dependency is our degree of vulnerability."--Rob Hopkins
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Finite.

About Rob Hopkins' TED Talk

Community organizer Rob Hopkins argues that individuals, towns and communities have a large role to play in lowering our dependence on fossil fuels.

About Rob Hopkins

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Space
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

On The Cold, Dead Fringes Of The Solar System, Pluto Looks Shockingly Lively

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 12:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years.
Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 10:14 am

For the past quarter-century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been gathering data from more than 400 scientists around the world on climate trends.

The report on 2014 from these international researchers? On average, it was the hottest year ever — in the ocean, as well as on land.

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Environment
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Reduce, Reuse, Remove The Cellophane: Recycling Demystified

Workers pull out plastic and trash from a conveyor belt of paper at a recycling plant in Elkridge, Md. The plant processes 1,000 tons of recyclable materials every day.
Dianna Douglas NPR

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 10:29 am

It's easy to think we're being virtuous when we fill up the blue recycling bin and put it on the curb. But it's clear we have embraced some magical thinking when it comes to what can be recycled.

Morning Edition asked its social media followers to share what puzzles them the most about the recycling process. Then, NPR's Dianna Douglas visited a waste management plant in Elkridge, Md., to get the answers from Michael Taylor, director of recycling operations for the plant.

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Movie Interviews
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Little Hero, Big Screen: The Entomology Of 'Ant-Man'

Visual effects supervisor Jake Morrison wanted Ant-Man's titular insects to be both accurate and relatable.
Marvel

Originally published on Sun July 19, 2015 11:56 pm

If superheroes are one of the ultimate expressions of individualism, what are we to make of Ant-Man, a Marvel Comics character based on one of the least individual, most collective creatures on the planet?

Ant-Man can shrink to the size of an ant — and, in the movie which opens this weekend, ants are his greatest allies. "The ants are loyal, brave and will be your partners on this job," explains the scientist who invented Ant-Man's supersuit.

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Shots - Health News
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong.
Marko Korosec Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 10:19 am

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

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History
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Seven Decades Ago, A New, Enormous Kind Of Explosion

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:26 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

How Air Pollution May Have Caused Catastrophic Flooding In China

On July 9, 2013, heavy floodwaters swept through Beichuan in southwest China's Sichuan province.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 6:45 am

Air pollution isn't just bad for your health. It can have dramatic effects on weather and climate. In fact, a team of scientists believes that air pollution from industries and traffic could have caused the extreme floods that devastated southwest China in 2013.

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