Science & Environment

Shots - Health News
6:14 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Shutdown Imperils Costly Lab Mice, Years Of Research

Bob Adams is a lab animal veterinarian at Johns Hopkins University.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 8:33 pm

The government shutdown is likely to mean an early death for thousands of mice used in research on diseases such as diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer's.

Federal research centers including the National Institutes of Health will have to kill some mice to avoid overcrowding, researchers say. Others will die because it is impossible to maintain certain lines of genetically altered mice without constant monitoring by scientists. And most federal scientists have been banned from their own labs since Oct. 1.

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Shots - Health News
12:32 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Our Skin's Sense Of Time Helps Protect Against UV Damage

Your skin knows the time.
iStockphoto.com

We all feel the biological master clock, ticking deep within our brains, that tells us when to sleep and when to wake.

Well, it turns out that our skin cells have a circadian rhythm of their own. Researchers have found that depending on the time of day, our skin's stem cells busy themselves with different types of tasks.

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Science
11:20 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Why Is The Higgs Boson A 'Big Whoop' For All Of Us?

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 2:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We've talked before on this program about why Latinos in the U.S. are more likely to tweet and use other social media than other Americans. Today, we're going to hear from a Latino tech leader who wants to boost the Latino presence in the science and business of technology. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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Environment
2:56 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Deal To Save The Everglades?

Mechanical harvesters cut sugar cane on U.S. Sugar Corp. land in Clewiston, Fla., in 2008, the same year the state struck a deal to buy most of the company's Everglades holdings.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:49 am

South of Florida's Lake Okeechobee, hundreds of thousands of acres of sugar cane thrive in the heart of one of the world's largest wetlands. The Everglades stretches from the tip of the peninsula to central Florida, north of Lake Okeechobee.

"The Everglades actually begins at Shingle Creek, outside of Orlando," says Jonathan Ullman of the Sierra Club.

That's nearly 200 miles north of the agricultural land that Ullman and other environmentalists say is crucial to state and federal efforts to restore the wetlands area to a healthy ecosystem.

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Science & Environment
10:42 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

State Releases Final Proposed Coal Ash Settlement With Duke

The Riverbend Steam Station
Credit Duke Energy

State water regulators and Duke Energy want to wrap up a lawsuit over possible contamination to rivers that feed water supplies for Asheville and Charlotte. The state released a final proposed settlement Tuesday, but environmental groups say it lacks teeth.

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The Salt
5:53 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Fish For Dinner? Here Are A Few Tips For Sea Life Lovers

A fishmonger tosses a just-purchased fresh salmon to a colleague behind the counter at the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:00 pm

If sustainability is a top priority when you're shopping at the fish counter, wild-caught seafood can be fraught with ethical complications.

One major reason why: bycatch, or the untargeted marine life captured accidentally by fishermen and, often, discarded dead in heaps. It's one of the most problematic aspects of industrial fishing.

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Shots - Health News
5:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
James Cavallini Science Source

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:51 pm

Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret.

That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known. It causes botulism, and the newly identified form of it can't be neutralized by any available treatment.

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Science
5:37 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Nobel Chemistry Prize Goes To Scientists Who Made Computer Models

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel Wednesday. Karplus, Levitt and Warshel won the prize for laying the foundation for computer models that help researchers understand and predict chemical processes like the purification of exhaust fumes or photosynthesis in green leaves.

The Salt
3:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Sweet. Tart. Crunchy: How To Engineer A Better Apple

The just-released Riverbelle is one of well over 100 new apple varieties to hit markets around the world in the past six years.
Courtesy of Honeybear Brands

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:04 pm

Browsing farmers markets this fall, you may find some new apple varieties mixed in with the Granny Smiths, McIntoshes and Fujis. Susan Brown, head of the apple breeding program at Cornell University, estimates that there have been 130 new apples released around the world in the past six years.

This summer, she contributed two more to that tally: the SnapDragon and the Ruby Frost.

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All Tech Considered
3:25 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

An Innovation For Pain Relief That's Worthy Of Some Buzz

Buzzy uses high-frequency vibration and a cold pack to make shots, well ... if not enjoyable, then at least bearable.
MMJ Labs

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