same sex marriage

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Same sex couples can continue to get married in North Carolina, after Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision, Obergefell v. Hodges. North Carolina has a ban on same-sex marriage in its constitution, after a voter referendum in 2012, but a federal judge in Asheville struck it down in October 2014.

NC General Assembly

North Carolina magistrates can now opt out of performing same-sex marriages on religious grounds.

When Governor Pat McCrory vetoed this bill 13 days ago he wrote, “No public official who voluntarily swears an oath to support and defend the Constitution should be exempt from upholding that oath.”

The Senate quickly voted to override that veto. But in the House the vote had been delayed for more than a week as Speaker Tim Moore and Republican leadership worked to make sure they had the votes they needed.

Courtesy of the Governor's Office

In an hour-long interview with WFAE’s Charlotte Talks Monday, Governor Pat McCrory lashed out at Republican lawmakers in Raleigh for what he sees as bad and misguided legislation. This includes a proposal to redistribute sales tax and what’s become known as ‘The Magistrate Bill.’

Last year, North Carolinians voted in favor of an amendment that bans same-sex marriage and civil unions. The Supreme Court recently weighed the decision of repealing the Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8, we are still awaiting their decision. But activists are not giving up and are holding out hope that with continued education gays will one day have the right to marry in this state. It’s a passionate discussion that brings up serious questions like religious beliefs versus constitutional rights, sexual identity versus ‘lifestyle’ choice. We will speak with local activists about where we are headed, when Charlotte Talks.