Roy Cooper

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Jmturner (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Republican leaders of the General Assembly made a surprising announcement Tuesday night: They had accepted an HB 2 repeal deal proposed by Democratic Governor Roy Cooper. There's just one problem. Cooper denies this particular deal was ever on the table. And the story gets even stranger.

What happened Tuesday night can be seen as a deal gone bad, political theater, or a hardcore negotiating technique.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

One year ago House Bill 2 was born. The controversial legislation was passed in a special session of the General Assembly and signed into law later the same day.

On the one year anniversary it seemed something was in the works, that a repeal of HB 2 was, possibly, about to happen. 

Then nothing did.

WUNC-TV

For the first time Governor Roy Cooper stood before a joint session of the legislature to deliver his state of the state address.

It was a chance for Cooper to push his priorities. But given the tone of the official Republican response, that's a tall order.

Every two years North Carolina's governor is invited to give the state of the state address. And here is how Governor Roy Cooper sees it: "I want to begin by reporting to you that the state of our state is promising."

It's an interesting choice, which needed some explanation.

NCGA Photo Gallery

The North Carolina House has passed a trio of new bills that would limit the powers of Governor Roy Cooper. Two of these bills would revoke the governor's authority to fill judicial vacancies. Reporter Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry to discuss. 

scales of justice
Scott*/Flickr

Three Superior Court judges are now deliberating a case that could have broad implications for how the state of North Carolina is run.

The plaintiff is Democratic Governor Roy Cooper. The defendants are House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate Pro Tem Phil Berger, the leaders of the Republican-dominated General Assembly.

North Carolina Senate Republicans are moving ahead with the confirmation process of Governor Roy Cooper's Cabinet members, even as a three-judge panel weighs the legality of doing so.

North Carolina State Senator Joel Ford is officially tossing his hat into the race for Charlotte mayor.

"It's time for new leadership and a bold vision for our city," Ford said in a campaign-produced video released Wednesday, "We need a mayor who will focus on the issues that unite our city, not divide it."

Screen Grab via WRAL

For the first time, Governor Roy Cooper has laid out his priorities in an official budget proposal for the state. Overall he calls for increased spending, but there is notable exception. He wants to phase out North Carolina’s private school voucher program. 

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper wants to increase state government spending next year by more than 5 percent, or $1.1 billion, and to issue about $350 million in new debt to renovate state buildings.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Late Wednesday, a 5th bill to repeal HB 2 was filed at the General Assembly. But this bill stands out from the others. It is the only measure sponsored by both Democrats and Republicans.

House Bill 186 was reportedly hammered out between two Democrats and two Republicans. However, at least five other Republicans have signed on as sponsors. Representative Craig Horn of Union County is one of them.

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