Roy Cooper

A Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer was arrested early Friday morning for communicating a threat toward other officers while acting drunk and disorderly.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police say they've charged 51-year-old Antonio Gaines for his involvement in a sexual assault that occurred 24 years ago near uptown Charlotte.

Police say the assault took place on April 23, 1993. A woman was kidnapped and sexually assaulted by several men in the 400 block of Caldwell Street. The police department collected and analyzed evidence of the crime, but were unable to identify any suspects.

The CMPD Sexual Assault Cold Case Unit reopened the investigation and re-examined DNA evidence, leading to confirmation of Gaines as a suspect in Jan. 2017.

John Arrowood
James, McElroy & Diehl

Updated 1:06 p.m.
A battle between Gov. Roy Cooper and state lawmakers over the state Court of Appeals has escalated, with the governor's appointment of a new judge Monday. Cooper got the chance to pick a Democrat after a Republican judge on the court retired early to protest his party’s efforts to shrink the court. 

Several progressive and Democratic groups have organized the first candidate forum of Charlotte's upcoming mayoral race. The forum will feature all three of the Democratic candidates who've announced plans to run.

The Atlantic Coast Conference is returning its championship events to North Carolina, including the 2017 football championship game set to be held in Charlotte in December.

Updated 4:25 p.m.
The state Senate on Tuesday passed a bill to reduce the number of state appeals court judges, and gave preliminary final approval to a bill that would relax state regulations on the environment and businesses. Senators also confirmed three more Cabinet picks of Gov. Roy Cooper, for commerce, environment and cultural resources. Other bills making their way through the General Assembly would enact new restrictions on opioids, and limit lawsuits against large hog farms. 

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Jmturner (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Republican leaders of the General Assembly made a surprising announcement Tuesday night: They had accepted an HB 2 repeal deal proposed by Democratic Governor Roy Cooper. There's just one problem. Cooper denies this particular deal was ever on the table. And the story gets even stranger.

What happened Tuesday night can be seen as a deal gone bad, political theater, or a hardcore negotiating technique.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

One year ago House Bill 2 was born. The controversial legislation was passed in a special session of the General Assembly and signed into law later the same day.

On the one year anniversary it seemed something was in the works, that a repeal of HB 2 was, possibly, about to happen. 

Then nothing did.

WUNC-TV

For the first time Governor Roy Cooper stood before a joint session of the legislature to deliver his state of the state address.

It was a chance for Cooper to push his priorities. But given the tone of the official Republican response, that's a tall order.

Every two years North Carolina's governor is invited to give the state of the state address. And here is how Governor Roy Cooper sees it: "I want to begin by reporting to you that the state of our state is promising."

It's an interesting choice, which needed some explanation.

NCGA Photo Gallery

The North Carolina House has passed a trio of new bills that would limit the powers of Governor Roy Cooper. Two of these bills would revoke the governor's authority to fill judicial vacancies. Reporter Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry to discuss. 

Pages