Robert Pittenger

house.gov

All 13 of North Carolina's representatives in the U.S. House voted in favor of an overhaul of the country's mental health system Wednesday. The bill gained momentum this year in part because of mass shootings.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

There were a lot of unknowns going into yesterday’s congressional primaries. New districts mandated by court order meant new voters and new challengers for incumbents. Plus, a separate Election Day from most other races meant especially low turnout.

Sarah Delia / WFAE

Her challengers doubted her Mecklenburg County residency, but Congresswoman Alma Adams easily won the Democratic primary in the 12th district that’s now entirely within Mecklenburg County.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

North Carolina Republicans began gathering in Greensboro Friday for their 2016 State Convention.

These are normally events where people rally around candidates, platforms and their party. This year, in this state however, it was also a chance for party faithful to show defiance against the Federal Government.


After a short filing period, the fields are set for June 7 primaries in North Carolina’s redrawn Congressional districts. Ten of the 13 incumbents face primaries, including both in the districts serving Mecklenburg County.

www.northcarolinasociety.org

Beyond the heated rhetoric between Republicans and Democrats over President Obama’s executive action on guns, there is an area of agreement: better mental health treatment and some sharing of records. Several Republican Congressmen from North Carolina are co-sponsoring bills that deal with those issues and have some Democratic support.

New Congressmen Prepare For Obscure Side Of The Job

Dec 4, 2012
Tasnim Shamma

Election season is a time of talking points, where politicians boast of their influence and often take simplistic stances on complex issues so they can be easily digested by the media and voters.

Less talked about is the unglamorous, but equally important part of the job that goes with being a Member of Congress: casework. A Member of Congress's district office helps constituents with problems with federal agencies, such as processing visas and passports or filling out Medicare paperwork.

Briana Duggan / WFAE

The 9th district congressional seat will remain Republican. Former state Sen. Robert Pittenger defeated Mecklenburg County Commissioner Jennifer Roberts 52 to 46 percent. Pittenger will replace Republican Sue Myrick, who is retiring after 18 years in office.

In his victory speech at the Marriott SouthPark, Pittenger spoke of freedoms under attack, “especially the free enterprise system.”

And he pledged that he will work to that system. from the government.

“The greatest anecdote to poverty is the free enterprise system, not the government.”

Michael Tomsic

The two candidates who aim to represent North Carolina’s 9th District Congressional seat held their first debate Wednesday. Republican Robert Pittenger and Democrat Jennifer Roberts are running to fill the open seat created by the retirement of Republican Sue Myrick.

Pittenger is a former three-term state senator, and Roberts is finishing her fourth term as a Mecklenburg County Commissioner. A small crowd turned out at the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce to watch the debate.