Gwendolyn Glenn

A bill which could change the way your neighborhood looks has made its way to Governor Pat McCrory’s desk.

Under current law, cities and towns can use zoning ordinances to mandate how new homes look on the outside. The type of siding or roof shingles, number and style of windows, in some cases even the color of houses.

Leaders on health policy in the North Carolina House are pushing their version of a bill to overhaul the state's most expensive health care program: Medicaid. The lawmakers rolled out the bill in committee Wednesday.

House leaders want to overhaul Medicaid by putting groups of doctors and hospitals in charge of managing the program. The state would give them a set amount of money based on who they treat, and the doctors would face financial penalties or rewards based on how they do. 

Republican Representative Nelson Dollar is one of the bill's sponsors. 

With the pending U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on gay marriage expected, and the issue of whether North Carolina magistrate’s should be allowed a ‘religious objection’ to performing same-sex marriages, the culture wars over social issues are still being fought in earnest.

Denise Cross Photography

North Carolina voters will need to take a photo ID along with them to the polls next year.  That ID must by law reasonably resemble the person. The State Board of Election has drafted rules to lay out what that means and is holding public hearings on them across the state, including one in Charlotte Monday night. 

pat mccrory
Governor's office

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory explained Thursday why he does not think that signing new abortion regulations violates a campaign promise.

When McCrory was a candidate for governor, a moderator asked him this question during a debate:

"If you're elected governor, what further restrictions on abortion would you agree to sign? I'll start with you, Mr. McCrory," she said.

"None," McCrory replied.

But a bill passed this week will be the second one restricting abortions that McCrory will sign. 

Government & Heritage Library, State Library of NC

The process of legislating typically looks more like C-SPAN and less like ‘House of Cards,’ or other TV dramatizations of Washington. But the rules that govern Congress or the North Carolina General Assembly are both dense and malleable—occasionally you’ll see legislators exploit them in a way that seems made for TV. Below are some recent examples from the North Carolina Senate.

Wednesday night was a busy night in Raleigh. First, House lawmakers voted 79-36 to override the governor’s veto of a bill that will allow employers to sue workers who secretly take pictures or record audio in their place of business. The Senate had already voted to override the veto, which means the bill will become law.

Courtesy of the Governor's Office

A controversial bill which would allow business owners to sue employees who secretly record at the workplace has been vetoed by Governor Pat McCrory.

The measure is officially named the Property Protection Act. But its more widely known as the ‘Ag-Gag’ bill.

Hours after the North Carolina House of Representatives passed the legislation, Governor Pat McCrory announced he will veto a bill that would allow magistrates to opt out of performing marriages for same-sex couples. But lawmakers may have the votes to override that veto.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

Charlotte's city council will not shift local taxes and fees toward businesses as much as City Manager Ron Carlee proposed. The council and city staff have spent the past two months debating how to fill a $22 million hole in the city’s budget. That hole comes mostly from lost business taxes, after lower property reappraisals and the loss of a business license tax.