Pay Raise

Local News
4:58 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Superintendents Urge Lawmakers To Find Better Way To Fund Raises

Superintendents of Union County Schools (Mary Ellis, left), Gaston County Schools (Jeff Booker), Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools (Beverly Emory) and CMS (Heath Morrison, right) say senate's proposal to pay for teacher pay raises could hurt schools.
Credit Lisa Miller / WFAE

Several superintendents of North Carolina’s largest school districts worry teacher raises may come at the expense of the classroom.  The State Senate has approved a budget that would raise teacher pay on average 11 percent.  But it would pay for that in part by cutting the number of teacher assistants in half.

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools Superintendent Beverly Emory said at a press conference today losing those assistants could stall the state’s efforts to make sure kids are reading at grade-level. 

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Local News
7:05 am
Wed April 9, 2014

CMS To Ask County For An Extra $27 Million For Employee Raises

CMS Superintendent Heath Morrison argues for county money to cover employe pay raises.
Credit Lisa Miller

Charlotte Mecklenburg School officials plan to ask the county for an extra $46 million next year. Most of that would go for a 3 percent pay raise for all CMS employees. 


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Local News
10:37 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

McCrory Pledges $4,200 Raises Over Two Years For Beginning Teachers

A class at Piney Grove Elementary in Charlotte.
Credit Lisa Miller

Beginning teachers in North Carolina could receive a $4,200 pay raise over the next two years under the plan announced Monday by Governor Pat McCrory. Senate and House leaders say they’re behind it. 

Teachers in their first five years receive a base pay of $30,800 dollars, not including local salary supplements. McCrory said that’s too low.    

“That’s not even enough to raise a family or pay off student loans,” said McCrory at a press conference in Guilford County, recorded by WRAL-TV.   

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Education
8:00 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Districts Work To Identify Top Teachers For Bonuses

Teachers did not get a raise this year, but state lawmakers have set aside bonuses for the top 25 percent of teachers next year.  It’s up to school districts to figure out who those teachers are -- and that’s no easy task. 


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