NC voter ID law

vote here sign
Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Updated 1:25 p.m.
The U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear an appeal seeking to reinstate North Carolina's controversial 2013 overhaul of voting laws, including  voter ID.  The decision lets stand a 2016 appeals court ruling that invalidated the law, saying it targeted African Americans.  Meanwhile, legislative Republicans are vowing to find another way revive an ID requirement for voting. 

North Carolina is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review a lower court ruling striking down the state's voter ID requirement and other election changes. Attorneys representing the state's Republican leaders filed their petition last week.

vote here sign
Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A federal judge in Winston-Salem will hear arguments Wednesday over the recent cancellations of up to 4,500 voter registrations. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP alleges some of those cancellations targeted African-Americans, and all of them violate federal law. The North Carolina Board of Elections calls that a legal misinterpretation that puts registration policies in most states in jeopardy. Either way, advances in technology have changed the way these cancellations happen.

Early voting lines at Charlotte's Veterans Park in 2012.
Jennifer Lang / WFAE

The number of early votes cast in Mecklenburg County for the Nov. 8 election is behind the pace of early voting in the past two presidential elections, according to figures from the county board of elections. Turnout numbers should start rising faster: More early voting sites opened across North Carolina Thursday. That's welcome news for voters who were deterred by long lines at some polling sites last week.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Early voting begins Thursday in Mecklenburg County and across North Carolina. Because of a federal appeals court decision, it's an earlier start this year than Republican lawmakers wanted.

Early voting cuts were part of a 2013 election overhaul the appeals judges described as "the most restrictive voting law North Carolina has seen since the era of Jim Crow."