NC Supreme Court

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Cyberbullying has been a criminal offense in North Carolina since 2009. But the state supreme court has ruled a key part of the cyberbullying law is unconstitutional. In a unanimous decision last week, the court found it violates the First Amendment by restricting speech.

WFAE's Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey ro discuss.

Courtesy of Matthew Bryant

Eminent domain is one of the most powerful tools of government. It allows officials to force the sale of private property for what’s deemed the public good. On Friday, the North Carolina Supreme Court struck down a 1987 law which, in effect, was a type of eminent domain used in the state to keep the cost of transportation projects down.  WFAE’s Tom Bullock breaks down the ruling with Morning Edition host Marshall Terry.

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On June 7, North Carolina holds a special primary. And nearly all the focus of that primary has been on those running for the U.S. House. But there is another race on that ballot, the only one that is a state wide contest. At stake is control of the North Carolina Supreme Court.

When it comes to eminent domain, North Carolina is one of 13 states that allow its transportation department to effectively control private property that may someday become part of a road. This means that compensation may take years, or in some cases, decades. This power is granted through what’s called the Map Act.

ncleg.net

North Carolina is awaiting word from the nation’s highest court on whether its election can go forward as planned, or whether lawmakers must redraw congressional districts in less than two weeks. A lower court struck down the state’s 2011 congressional redistricting plan on Friday, and North Carolina is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to put that decision on hold.  WFAE’s Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry to sort through all this.

ncleg.net

The North Carolina Supreme Court has again upheld how Republican lawmakers redrew the state’s Congressional and legislative maps. The state’s highest court took a second look at the 2011 redistricting plan because of a U.S. Supreme Court order.

The argument is about whether Republican state lawmakers went too far in packing African-Americans into a few districts. Since they tend to vote Democratic, that meant the GOP had a better shot of winning the remaining districts. 

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The North Carolina Supreme Court on Monday will once again hear arguments over the state's 2011 redistricting plan. The court had already approved the way state lawmakers redrew the voting districts. But the U.S. Supreme Court is ordering North Carolina to take another look.

ncleg.net

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative districts, it's still unclear whether those districts are constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday tossed out the North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling in December that upheld the redistricting. The nation's highest court is ordering the state court to reconsider the case in light of a similar Alabama case it recently decided.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that North Carolina courts were wrong to decide that GPS ankle bracelets don't count as searches.

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North Carolina state government has paid about $4 million in private school tuition this year. It’s part of the Opportunity Scholarship program, which has paid up to $4,200 to mostly religious schools on behalf of 1,200 low-income students.

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