NC Medicaid

North Carolina's Democratic representatives in Congress are urging federal officials to reject the state's Medicaid overhaul. The state's Republican governor and lawmakers have championed it, and leaders submitted the plan to the federal government in June.


North Carolina is overhauling its Medicaid program to try to hold down costs while improving care. Health leaders submitted the plan to the federal government recently after adjusting it based on public feedback.

nffcnnr / Flickr

A state audit released Monday shows overpayments in North Carolina’s Medicaid program likely added up to $835 million last year. But Medicaid officials say when you factor in the size of North Carolina’s program, its error rate is lower than many other states.

Michael Tomsic

North Carolina is in the midst of a huge change to its Medicaid program, and state officials took their listening tour about it to the Charlotte area Thursday. In Huntersville and Monroe, they heard from patients, advocates and doctors.

State health officials are holding public hearings in Monroe and Huntersville on Thursday on the plan to overhaul North Carolina Medicaid.

North Carolina’s Medicaid program is continuing a recent trend of meeting its budget or coming in under. The state health department is telling lawmakers this week the program was $181 million under budget as of December.

Medicaid is always one of the biggest expenditures for states, and North Carolina is overhauling its program to try to make its budget more predictable. The overhaul is essentially a mixture of health care models that are gaining national prominence. The result will change who's in charge of keeping low-income patients healthy and how North Carolina pays for it.

Public Domain

North Carolina lawmakers Tuesday passed fundamental changes to the state's Medicaid program. If Governor Pat McCrory signs it, it would change who's in charge of keeping patients healthy and how the state pays for it.

Leaders on health policy in the North Carolina House are pushing their version of a bill to overhaul the state's most expensive health care program: Medicaid. The lawmakers rolled out the bill in committee Wednesday.

House leaders want to overhaul Medicaid by putting groups of doctors and hospitals in charge of managing the program. The state would give them a set amount of money based on who they treat, and the doctors would face financial penalties or rewards based on how they do. 

Republican Representative Nelson Dollar is one of the bill's sponsors. 

Provided by the NC Medical Society – Chip Baggett – Jennifer Gasperini – Dave Horne

Doctors across North Carolina will soon have to pay back a chunk of what they earned treating Medicaid patients over the past 14 months. The retroactive pay cut is part of a law passed in 2013 and tweaked last year. As you can imagine, doctors aren't too happy about giving back money the state has already paid them.