NC General Assembly

Court Orders New Legislative Districts and Elections in 2017

Nov 29, 2016

Federal judges have told the North Carolina legislature to redraw its own districts by mid-March to replace ones the court struck down and to hold a special election under redrawn maps in November 2017.

The ruling Tuesday means those elected to the state House and Senate a few weeks ago would serve just one year, not two as expected.

Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts and some city council members have rejected a compromise that state Republican leaders offered on the controversial House Bill 2. They said they have no plans to vote Monday night on repealing their expansion of the city’s non-discrimination ordinance, which prompted the law.

  South Carolina elections officials say former state representative Charles Jeter did NOT vote in the state in 2004. That contradicts a TV report this week suggesting Jeter voted twice that year. 

NC General Assembly

This week is a big week for the North Carolina General Assembly. The state’s fiscal year ends on Friday. But the budget still needs to be passed and lawmakers aren’t just working on that. The Senate today is expected to vote on a trio of amendments to the North Carolina constitution.  

WFAE’s Tom Bullock talks with Morning Edition Host Marshall Terry.

 An unaffiliated candidate has gathered enough signatures to get her name on the November ballot as a challenger for the state 98th District House seat. Jane Campbell of Davidson will face Republican incumbent John Bradford of Cornelius, who is seeking his second term.

The North Carolina Senate approved a bill Monday that would ban wind farms across much of the state. The "Military Operations Protection Act," which passed 33-14, would not allow wind turbines in areas with military training flights.

Michael Tomsic

The Charlotte Chamber reports the number of businesses interested in Mecklenburg County has declined substantially. The reason? North Carolina’s controversial law affecting LGBT people. The Chamber is trying to increase pressure on state lawmakers and city council members to make changes.

The North Carolina General Assembly is back in session today. Governor McCrory and Senate leader Phil Berger have laid out their priorities. They include teacher raises that average 5 percent, and leaving HB2 mostly intact - although the governor does want a provision repealed that deals with the right to sue. But what about the priorities of lawmakers in the Charlotte area? Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks to WFAE's David Boraks.

Jorge Valencia / WFAE

Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in downtown Raleigh Monday to show their approval of the controversial House Bill 2. It was the biggest public demonstration in support of a law that has garnered widespread criticism. WUNC's Jorge Valencia reports.

Courtesy WRAL.com

Updated 6:30 p.m.

The first legal challenge to North Carolina’s House Bill 2 was filed Monday in federal court. That’s the law passed by a special session of the General Assembly last week and signed into law by Governor McCrory the same day.

HB 2 includes sweeping measures, though supporters say it mostly ‘clarifies’ what cities, towns and counties can do to limit discrimination in hiring, firing and places of public accommodation. This includes public schools and campuses throughout the UNC System.

Updated 12:15 p.m.

A federal lawsuit was filed Monday to stop House Bill 2. That’s the law passed by a special session of the General Assembly last week in response to Charlotte's updated non-discrimination ordinance that gave protections to LGBT people. Governor McCrory signed the legislation the same day.

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