Military

Veterans Affairs
9:32 am
Tue August 26, 2014

Veterans Air Grievances About VA During Town Hall

Verna Jones, staff director at the American Legion office in Washington, D.C. holds the microphone for John Worholak of South Carolina.
Credit Tasnim Shamma

The American Legion was one of the first veterans groups to call for the resignation of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki after an inspector general report this year found that veterans were waiting months to get an appointment.

On Tuesday, President Barack Obama will be speaking at the Charlotte Convention Center to a crowd of veterans attending the Legion’s national conference. His remarks will be followed by a speech by the new V.A. Secretary Robert McDonald. He replaced Shinseki after he resigned earlier this year.

And the V.A. is on the minds of many veterans attending the conference. Monday night, about two dozen veterans participated in a town hall meeting to air their grievances and share their experiences with the V.A. system.  


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Arts & Life
3:30 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Medal Of Honor Recipient Who Called Fayetteville Home Now Honored With Stamp

Rudy Hernandez, U.S. Army Medal of Honor recipient, at a 2009 NASA event in Langley, Virginia.
Credit NASA/Sean Smith

Nearly seven million people donned American military uniforms to fight in the Korean War.

Of those, just 145 received the highest military commendation this country can bestow…the Medal of Honor.

Saturday, at Arlington National Cemetery, the United States Postal Service, will issue a new set of stamps immortalizing a few of those Medal of Honor recipients, the 13 still alive when the series was commissioned. One of them was a man who called Fayetteville home. 

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Combat Artist Rob Bates (Rebroadcast)

Rob Bates

Former Marine and UNC Charlotte student Rob Bates has served on two active duty tours in Afghanistan. This past December he went back, not as a soldier, but as an embedded combat artist, returning to the war-torn country to sketch the drawdown of U.S. forces. Many of his drawings are photo realistic - he draws soldiers' portraits, combat scenes and military posts, sometimes having to make a decision on the spot if it's safe enough to sketch now or photograph a scene to draw later. Some of his work is part of the combat art collection at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. We'll talk about his work as an artist, a Marine and get his "boots on the ground" perspective of the U.S. drawdown in Afghanistan. (Originally Aired 1/22/2013)

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Camp Greene

Unnamed soldier practices at Camp Greene rifle range in 1918.
Credit Martha Spurrier May

There are important moments in the development of any large city. Charlotte's history goes back to the fortuitous intersection of two trading paths that later became Trade and Tryon Streets. But there is another critical moment in the development of our region and it is forever tied to a tent city on the outskirts of town during the first World War. Camp Greene was not here long but its story, and the story of the town that became a city around it has been a nearly three decade long quest for Jack Dillard. Mr. Dillard has studied the history of the camp since the early '80’s and he recently made a documentary chronicling the camp's history. We'll learn more about this pivotal time in our region, when Charlotte Talks.

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Combat Artist Rob Bates

Rob Bates

  Former Marine and UNC Charlotte student Rob Bates has served on two active duty tours in Afghanistan. This past December he went back, not as a soldier, but as an embedded combat artist, returning to the war-torn country to sketch the drawdown of U.S. forces. Many of his drawings are photo realistic - he draws soldiers' portraits, combat scenes and military posts, sometimes having to make a decision on the spot if it's safe enough to sketch now or photograph a scene to draw later. Some of his work is part of the combat art collection at the National Museum of the Marine Corps.

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Student Veterans And The GI Bill

The GI Bill was created to give soldiers a way to go to college cost-free after they finished their service. But a cost-cutting change to the benefit may mean a big tuition bill for some vets. It now only covers in-state tuition, a problem for some returning soldiers who spent years bouncing from base to deployment without establishing residency anywhere. Some North Carolina veterans say the UNC system makes it even harder for them to qualify and now they’re suing.

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Tue November 13, 2012

Paula Broadwell (Rebroadcast)

Gen. David Petraeus and Paula Broadwell.

Charlottean Paula Broadwell was given unprecedented access to General David Petraeus during his time in Afghanistan for her doctoral dissertation and a book called All In: The Education of General David Petraeus. After making the rounds of every talk show you can name, she joined us in March. But over the weekend news broke of an alleged affair between Petraeus and Broadwell which caused interest in the archive of that program on our website to spike. Because of that we replay that conversation, when Charlotte Talks.

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Wounded Warriors And Life After War

Tommy Rieman with President George Bush and Laura Bush

The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are winding down but for many returning warriors, a new battle has just begun. Thousands of soldiers are coming home with missing limbs, other severe injuries and PTSD. There are resources in place to help them but the challenges are great. Two decorated war heroes are in Charlotte this weekend to bring more awareness to the issues soldiers face here at home. We’ll also meet the head of an organization helping to ease their return to civilian life and as well as an expert helping soldiers become whole again. We’ll discuss the battle after the war when Charlotte Talks.

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Local News
9:21 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Student Veterans Plan To Sue UNC For Discrimination

Soldiers with their helmets next to them.
The U.S. Army

A group of veterans attending state-run universities in North Carolina plan to file a discrimination lawsuit against the UNC system this week alleging they are routinely - and wrongly - made to pay out-of-state tuition.

The military life is a transient one - training in one state, based in another, transferring every few of years. That's one reason the federal government doesn't require service members to change their driver license every time they move. So establishing residency for things like in-state tuition is tough, says Army veteran Andrew Sammons.

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