Medicaid

N.C. Senate chamber
Government & Heritage Library, State Library of NC

The North Carolina Senate has tentatively passed big changes to Medicaid and sales tax distributions. Senate leaders are calling the bills compromises, but there are still differences to work out with the House.

On Medicaid, Senate leaders favor giving insurance companies more responsibility for managing the government health care program. The House and Governor Pat McCrory would rather give that authority to groups of doctors and hospitals. So the Senate is advancing a bill that allows both insurance companies and groups of doctors and hospitals to take more control.

Berger
North Carolina General Assembly

Hoping it will help jump start negotiations on North Carolina’s budget, state senators are offering major concessions to the House. But they want something in return. 

For weeks now senior budget writers from both the House and Senate have been talking, just not about the numbers in their budgets.

"We have had discussion on the economic development proposals and the Medicaid proposals," said Senate President Pro-Tem Phil Berger.

  "I think we are....," Berger then took a long pause before finishing,"closer than we have ever been in getting those things worked out."

NC DHHS

North Carolina's highest ranking health official is stepping down. Aldona Wos has led Governor Pat McCrory's health department since 2013. Her tenure included threats from the federal government over food stamp delays but also significant improvements in the state's Medicaid budget.

Images_of_Money / Flickr

Some lawyers say the U.S. Attorney's office in Charlotte is building a reputation for being especially aggressive in prosecuting health care fraud. As an example, the office earlier this year won its largest settlement ever with a single doctor.

The North Carolina Hospital Association says the budget deal state lawmakers have reached could lead to hospitals cutting services and jobs. The budget agreement cuts $45 million for hospitals on top of cuts already scheduled for this year.

Governor Pat McCrory, the state House and Senate have significant differences to work out before North Carolina adopts a budget. WFAE's Michael Tomsic looks at three examples of those differences: teacher pay, film incentives and Medicaid.

Medicaid Reform in North Carolina

May 12, 2014
TaxRebate.org.uk

Governor Pat McCrory's administration is taking a new approach to overhauling the state's most expensive health care program. Medicaid serves approximately 1.8 million low-income parents, children, seniors and people with disabilities. McCrory had previously rolled out a model that would've probably put a few insurance companies in charge of managing the program. But after many in North Carolina's medical community made it clear they didn't like that approach, the governor has changed course and submitted a new plan to the General Assembly, with the hopes of getting it passed in the short legislative session that starts this week. We take a closer look at Medicaid in North Carolina and what the new plan would mean for patients, providers and taxpayers, when Charlotte Talks.

Mecklenburg County commissioners voted 7-2 last night to work out an agreement to turn oversight of mental health, substance abuse, and disability care to Cardinal Innovations, less than a year after the county launched its own agency, MeckLINK, at a cost of more than $8 million. The county started MeckLINK because of a state reorganization, and now it has to give it up because of another one.


Cardinal Has Bargaining Power In MeckLINK Takeover

Nov 5, 2013
Ben Bradford / WFAE

Mecklenburg County commissioners met with the leadership team of Cardinal Innovations on Monday afternoon, in one of the final steps as the county prepares to surrender oversight of its mental health patients and millions of dollars in Medicaid funds. Commissioners had three requests for Cardinal, but little leverage to negotiate.


Michael Tomsic

Low-income families in Cabarrus County still face long delays before getting food stamps, although those delays are getting shorter.

They're tied to a new online system the state is making counties use for applications for food stamps. Cabarrus and Mecklenburg were among several counties the state called "code red" last month because of how much they struggled with the new system.

WFAE's Michael Tomsic reports on the progress those counties have made.   


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