Keith Lamont Scott

On September 20, 2016, Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was shot and killed by a Charlotte Mecklenburg Police officer, also a black man. Protests and riots erupted in Charlotte following the fatal shooting. Here you will find WFAE's coverage of the shooting and its aftermath.

Local News Roundup

Oct 7, 2016

On the local news roundup, CMPD releases all of the body and dash cam recordings in the Keith Scott shooting. What do they tell us? First Lady Michelle Obama is in town to stump for Hillary Clinton. What she said about Charlotte in her remarks. Governor McCrory acknowledges a need to repair relations between our city and the legislature and the ACC announces new game locations after pulling out of North Carolina. Those stories and more on the news roundup.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police have asked a police research group to do an independent review of their policies, procedures and ties with the community.

The Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., will evaluate CMPD’s policies and the Sept. 20 shooting of Keith Scott. Think of it as a report card with recommendations for improvement.

kerr putney
Charlotte Observer

Two weeks after the police shooting of Keith Scott, Charlotte Mecklenburg Police are trying to step back from the case and take a longer view of how they do their jobs. Police Chief Kerr Putney talked about the case on Wednesday, and how to move forward as a police department.

Body camera footage from a CMPD officer.

The family of Keith Lamont Scott, the black man who was fatally shot by a CMPD officer a little over 2 weeks ago, has reviewed the remaining dash and body camera footage of the incident. Calling for more transparency, the family asked that footage be made public, and it was last night. WFAE’s Sarah Delia discusses what we’ve learned by viewing this additional material. 

Jennifer Roser / WFAE

The recent shooting by police of Keith Scott and the unrest that followed has revealed problems in Charlotte, not unlike those we’ve witnessed in other parts of the country. But, what happened here doesn’t sit well with longtime Charlotteans who thought we had a tradition of solving problems “the Charlotte Way.” In a special two-hour Public Conversation, we examine what happened, look back on the city’s history and how it may have contributed to this, look forward to where we go from here and hear from you.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Charlotte Talks hosts a public conversation Tuesday night on strengthening trust after the shooting of Keith Scott. A forum is one way to approach this, but there are many one-on-one discussions going on in the community.  Here's one of them.

Body Cams: New Law And Effectiveness Of Cameras

Oct 3, 2016
A police officer wearing a body cam.
Tom Bullock / WFAE

The Keith Scott shooting has put new emphasis on police body and dash cams. CMPD has been criticized for being slow to release footage of this latest incident. Over the weekend, citizen access to that footage became even more difficult as a new law went into effect requiring a court order. Some, including our mayor, want the legislature to repeal that law. How likely is that? And how is this footage being used elsewhere?

The big story in Charlotte has been the shooting of Keith Scott and the protests that followed. And also the release of police body and dash cam video of the shooting, and the new law taking effect that requires a court order to release such video. We talk with our political analyst, Michael Bitzer, about that and more in this week's discussion.

Local News Roundup

Sep 30, 2016

On the local news roundup, Charlotte continues to be in the national news following the police shooting of Keith Scott. City Council was disrupted by protestors and the poignant sight of a young girl crying over mistreatment of African-Americans by police. More heat on Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf over the fake accounts scandal and Charlotte makes its way into this week’s presidential debate. Those stories and more with our roundtable of reporters.

diners at Essex Charlotte
David Boraks / WFAE

Businesses around Charlotte saw sales drop during last week's protests over the shooting death of Keith Scott. But now that a curfew has been lifted and the weekend is approaching, they're hoping for a rebound.

Violence during the first night of protests uptown last Wednesday left some hotels, stores and restaurants, including those around the EpiCentre, with broken windows and other physical damage.

But the week of protests also scared away customers, causing financial damage that most are still recovering from.  

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