Keith Lamont Scott

On September 20, 2016, Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was shot and killed by a Charlotte Mecklenburg Police officer, also a black man. Protests and riots erupted in Charlotte following the fatal shooting. Here you will find WFAE's coverage of the shooting and its aftermath.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Some Charlotte business, religious, and non-profit leaders have formed a new group to look at ways to help struggling neighborhoods. It's called One Charlotte and aims to help people in these areas have better 

access to jobs, quality education, and health care.

Mark Washburn / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte Observer

In his two decades in law enforcement, Det. Josh Gibson has investigated everything from a stolen can of beer to a double homicide.

But nothing has been like the cases he’s handled in the last month – he’s been hunting for looters from the Charlotte riots in September, and he’s awash in evidence.

Michael Tomsic / WFAE

A private autopsy was released late Wednesday for Keith L. Scott, the 43 year old African-American whose deadly encounter with police last month sparked riots and protests across Charlotte.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department

In an effort to improve transparency at the CMPD, the department’s website now includes a page where the general public can get more information on police shootings and traffic stops.


Repairing Charlotte's Damaged Reputation

Oct 11, 2016
Marshall Park, Charlotte
CC0 Public Domain

It’s been a tough year for Charlotte. First, HB2 put us in an unwelcomed spotlight and resulted in millions of dollars of losses. Then, protests and riots following a police shooting ripped at the heart of this new South city, tarnishing our sparkling reputation. What kind of damage has this done to our image and more importantly, how do we repair the internal damage to this city for those who live, work and do business here?

Mayor Jennifer Roberts
David Boraks / WFAE

The police shooting of an African -American man in Charlotte last month sparked protests not just about policing, but also about racism and inequality. In an open letter a week ago, Charlotte City Council pledged new policies and programs. Monday night, the council took what it called "the first steps."

In a single unanimous vote, the City Council approved a series of measures in response to community anger and frustration after the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.  They include:

Local News Roundup

Oct 7, 2016

On the local news roundup, CMPD releases all of the body and dash cam recordings in the Keith Scott shooting. What do they tell us? First Lady Michelle Obama is in town to stump for Hillary Clinton. What she said about Charlotte in her remarks. Governor McCrory acknowledges a need to repair relations between our city and the legislature and the ACC announces new game locations after pulling out of North Carolina. Those stories and more on the news roundup.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police have asked a police research group to do an independent review of their policies, procedures and ties with the community.

The Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., will evaluate CMPD’s policies and the Sept. 20 shooting of Keith Scott. Think of it as a report card with recommendations for improvement.

kerr putney
Charlotte Observer

Two weeks after the police shooting of Keith Scott, Charlotte Mecklenburg Police are trying to step back from the case and take a longer view of how they do their jobs. Police Chief Kerr Putney talked about the case on Wednesday, and how to move forward as a police department.

Body camera footage from a CMPD officer.

The family of Keith Lamont Scott, the black man who was fatally shot by a CMPD officer a little over 2 weeks ago, has reviewed the remaining dash and body camera footage of the incident. Calling for more transparency, the family asked that footage be made public, and it was last night. WFAE’s Sarah Delia discusses what we’ve learned by viewing this additional material. 

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