Keith Lamont Scott

On September 20, 2016, Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was shot and killed by a Charlotte Mecklenburg Police officer, also a black man. Protests and riots erupted in Charlotte following the fatal shooting. Here you will find WFAE's coverage of the shooting and its aftermath.

Captured by traffic camera

Rayquan Borum, the man accused of fatally shooting Justin Carr during protests after the fatal police shooting of Keith Scott last year, has a new attorney. Local activists, who have maintained that Borum is innocent are raising money to pay for his defense.

Activist Gemini Boyd speaks to Police Foundation consultants Monday night at Little Rock AME Zion Church in uptown Charlotte.
David Boraks / WFAE

Consultants reviewing CMPD's response to last year's protests in uptown Charlotte heard from speakers calling for changes in their draft report, and also how CMPD holds officers responsible. 

Protesters gather outside of CMPD headquarters, chanting, "release the tapes."
David Boraks / WFAE

A police consultant group that studied CMPD’s response to the protests that followed the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott last year will hold its final town hall meeting in Charlotte on Monday evening.

Frank Straub of the Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., talked to Charlotte City Council Monday.
David Boraks / WFAE

A consultant with the Police Foundation told Charlotte City Council Monday night that CMPD properly followed its own policies last year as it responded to violence following the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. But he said CMPD and city officials weren't fully prepared for the protests.

Police in riot gear march down Trade Street toward the Omni Hotel during protests Sept. 21, 2016, after the killing of Keith Lamont Scott.
David Boraks / WFAE

CMPD and the City of Charlotte say they're studying a consultant's recommendations for changes in police training, transparency and other policies. Those came in a report from The Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., hired by the city after demonstrations following the fatal police shooting of a black man last year. 

Erin Keever / WFAE

A year after the killing of Keith Scott, Charlotte is still debating both police shootings and the social and economic inequality that led to a week of protests. Just how well CMPD and the city are doing was the question Wednesday night during a two-hour Charlotte Talks Public Conversation at Spirit Square in uptown Charlotte.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The widow of Keith Lamont Scott, who was fatally shot one year ago, revisited the site of the shooting Wednesday. Rakeyia Scott was accompanied to the north Charlotte apartment complex on Lexington Circle by an attorney and family members, including Scott's children and four-month-old grandchild.

Standing several feet away from where her husband was shot last year, Scott told reporters that the past year had been a year of grieving.

Since the fatal shooting of Justin Carr during protests in uptown Charlotte last September, questions have lingered about who shot him. Raquan Borum was arrested and charged with first-degree murder, but people who were in the area at the time of the shooting have challenged the police account of what happened. 

Jenifer Roser / Erin Keever

Thursday, September 21, 2017

The shooting of Keith Lamont Scott on September 20, 2016 and the protests that followed shook Charlotte. It started conversations, sometimes uncomfortable ones, across the city that continue today. On the one year anniversary of the shooting, a WFAE Public Conversation examined what has changed, what hasn’t, and looked at some of the work that’s been done over the past year.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

Wednesday marks the one-year anniversary of the police killing of Keith Lamont Scott – and the birth of a protest movement called Charlotte Uprising.

The street protests that followed Keith Scott's killing brought all kinds of people to uptown Charlotte - longtime activists, students, uptown professionals, and local clergy. Within a couple of days, many were rallying around a social media hashtag - #CharlotteUprising.

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