Judges

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On Monday, Judge Douglas McCullough of the North Carolina Court of Appeals resigned his seat.  Some 36 days before he turned 72, which is the mandatory retirement age of the court.  The reason, McCullough says was simple. "I retired at that time because I did not want my legacy to the court to be the elimination of my seat and the impairment of the court."

Lisa Worf / WFAE

A bill that would divide Mecklenburg County into three separate judicial districts has drawn the ire of many judges. 

Here’s what’s in the headlines at midday Monday here on WFAE:  

Charlotte Area Transit System is asking Charlotte City Council to approve another $25 million for the Lynx Blue Line Extension. The project extends the light rail line nine miles from uptown to UNC Charlotte.

The state House of Representatives gave final approval Wednesday to a bill that would return local judgeship elections to partisan races. Meanwhile, a Senate committee advanced a bill to let voters decide this November whether to lower the constitutional cap on the state income tax to 5.5 percent.

http://realpages.com/sites/arnoldjones/

North Carolina Superior Court Judge Arnold Ogden Jones, II was arrested Wednesday, following a grand jury indictment Tuesday on charges that he bribed an FBI officer.

Jones is the Superior Court Judge for Wayne, Lenoir and Greene counties. According to court documents, in October, he sent a text message to an FBI officer, asking him to access and make copies of text messages of two telephone numbers.

For the first time in its history, the North Carolina Bar Association is urging a governor to veto legislation. House Bill 652 would limit what the public could know about judges who are reprimanded for misconduct.


There is an ongoing debate about how we seat judges in North Carolina. On one side are supporters of partisan judicial elections, on the other the appointment of judges by the sitting Governor. Other scenarios have been introduced as well. Last year Governor Perdue issued an executive order creating an 18 member committee to select a slate of judges for the Governor to choose from. One of Governor McCrory's first acts was to repeal that order. We'll look at how we choose judges in our state and some of the most popular suggestions for reform, when Charlotte Talks.

The Government Reorganization and Efficiency Act - which has passed the North Carolina senate and will now be considered by the House – has gotten a lot of attention because it would allow Republican leaders to remake a number of powerful commissions and regulatory bodies.  But the Act would also eliminate 12 Special Superior Court Judge positions – which got us wondering what a special superior court judge is.  So, we asked WFAE's Julie Rose to find out.