Hurricane Recovery

Credit SGT. JOSE DIAZ-RAMOS / PUERTO RICO NATIONAL GUARD

The recent spate of natural disasters have left many areas in need of assistance. This article identifies some ways you can help. Please check Charity Navigator or Guidestar to better understand how charities use your donations. 

Updated 1 p.m. ET Saturday

President Trump heads to storm-ravaged Puerto Rico on Tuesday and, in a series of tweets early Saturday morning, defended his administration's handling of the recovery effort while hitting back at Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan.

"The Mayor of San Juan, who was very complimentary only a few days ago, has now been told by the Democrats that you must be nasty to Trump," he wrote.

NC Native Describes Destruction in Puerto Rico

Sep 28, 2017
Courtesy Angel J. Rivera Lugo

Hickory native Ashley Wright runs a wedding business in Puerto Rico, but Hurricane Maria's destruction has her back in North Carolina for a while. She evacuated on a humanitarian flight Wednesday, and arrived in Charlotte on Thursday.

How You Can Help Victims Of Recent Disasters

Sep 28, 2017
Sgt. Jose Diaz-Ramos / Puerto Rico National Guard

These resources were excerpted from this post on NPR.org.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Julio Alicea's 8-month-old granddaughter Aubrey came down with severe respiratory problems a day after Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico. "We are very lucky," Alicea says. "The hospital is open and we live nearby." Aubrey's cough turned intense, and when she started vomiting, Alicea says, he rushed her to the hospital at 4 a.m.

She didn't have any respiratory issues before the hurricane, Alicea says, sitting on a blue bench outside San Jorge Children's Hospital in San Juan. His 3-year-old granddaughter Angelica is keeping him company.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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A flattened Puerto Rico and how Washington is looking out—or not—for the U.S. territory.

Puerto Rico has taken a devastating hit in the path of Hurricane Maria. Homes and infrastructure flattened. Electrical grid, flattened. Now water and food and gas, all in short supply. People really in trouble. Puerto Ricans are Americans. Are they getting the kind of backup we’ve seen after hurricanes hit Houston and Florida? The kind of support? This hour, On Point: We are turning to Puerto Rico in its hour of need to ask what’s being delivered. — Tom Ashbrook.

Much-needed supplies are either in Puerto Rico or on the way, officials say, but the island's governor acknowledges that they can't deliver fuel and other material quickly enough. Frustrated residents face long lines for fuel, as millions of people have gone nearly a week without power.

"We need resources and security. We need a quicker logistical deployment," Gov. Ricardo Rossello told NPR's Mary Louise Kelly on Tuesday. "You know, the gas and fuel issue is not a matter of how much do we have — it's a matter of how we can distribute it."

President Trump issued disaster declarations for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands after the passage of Hurricane Maria.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with U.S. Virgin Islands Gov. Kenneth Mapp (@govhouseusvi) about the recovery effort there.

Interview Highlights

On the situation after Maria

Updated at 2:45 a.m. ET Thursday

Hurricane Maria has damaged Puerto Rico's power infrastructure in ways that, in a worst-case scenario, could take months to repair, Gov. Ricardo Rosselló told CNN late Wednesday.

"Our telecommunications system is partially down," he said. "Our energy infrastructure is completely down."

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