Kultigin / Wikimedia Commons

Ah, November. When the leaves turn crimson and our thoughts turn to…clams? 

Yes. Also sardines, French toast, and nachos. Followers of WFAEats may recall that we like to recognize official food holidays from time to time. We rely on our friends at to keep us informed, so with their guidance we’re kicking off the month. 

Tasnim Shamma

This weekend, Muslims celebrated Eid-al-Adha (Feast of the Sacrifice), which marks the end of the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia. It also honors Prophet Abraham's obedience to God in his willingness to sacrifice his son.

So part of the holiday involves slaughtering an animal - like a cow or a goat - to then distribute the meat to relatives and the poor. For one local farm in York County, South Carolina, the holiday is the busiest day of the year.


Ah, spring! Time for rebirth, renewal, celebration - and the dreaded chores of spring cleaning. Ironic, isn't? Just when longer days are luring us outdoors to play, there’s housework demanding to be done.

Each year at springtime, flat, unleavened bread called matzo appears in stores as Jews prepare to observe Passover. But non-Jews may not realize that modern-day spring cleaning has roots in the holiday, too, as a ritual that reaches back thousands of years.

Love And Grilled Cheese

Mar 4, 2013

When I was a sophomore in high school, I had my first boyfriend.  We had just started dating that January, and I was thrilled to have a Valentine.  As the big day approached, I pressed him for what we might be doing for Valentine’s Day.  Each time I asked, he was a bit vague.  I reminded him that Valentine’s Day was one of the busiest days of the year for restaurants, and that if we were going to dinner he might want to think about making a reservation. 

I Loathe My Valentine

Feb 12, 2013

Giving chocolate is easy. But what if you want to send a different message this Valentine’s Day? Never fear, we’ve got great gift suggestions for those tasteless or unsavory people in your love life.

How about a life-sized gummi snake? You can curl it around your arm when you deliver it to that poisonous person, or let the recipient be surprised when he or she opens the box.

Handel’s Messiah is one of the most popular pieces of music in the world and one which - at least in the US - has become associated with Christmas.  We’re going to dissect this great piece with a man who knew it well - the late Paul Oakley who first shared his musical expertise about The Messiah with us in 2002.  We hear that conversation again and then share a little poem that captures the spirit of Christmas:  A Cup of Christmas Tea when Charlotte Talks. Originally Aired 12/4/2002.

With the holiday season in full swing, frantic gift-givers may be running short of ideas. Here are some new cookbooks sure to delight any appetite.

Armchair travelers will swoon over the exotic Burma: Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid. It’s thick with intriguing recipes and gorgeous photos.

The Bouchon Bakery Cookbook by Thomas Keller, Sebastien Rouel, et al.; is a big, beautiful “coffee-table” book of pastry delights with luscious photos by Deborah Jones.

"Jolly Old St. Nicholas," at least the way we've been brought up to think of him, is a red-cheeked, fat, white-bearded man in a red suit and hat. But the REAL St. Nicholas of Myra has a far different image. How did we get our modern idea of Santa Claus, or "St. Nick," and how does he compare with Nicholas of Myra? We'll be joined by a man who has chronicled the life Nicholas, and has studied the legend of Santa Claus and will put them together for us.

Amy Rogers

Latkes? Check. Chanukah gifts? Check.

Brandy-soaked sugar cubes to set afire…What’s that? You’ve never taken part in a Flaming Tea Ceremony for Chanukah?

Neither had I, nor anyone I knew, not in all our years of celebrating the Jewish holiday known as the "Festival of Lights."

It goes like this: Everyone at the table soaks a sugar cube in brandy, places it in a teaspoon, lights it with a candle, sings a holiday song, then drops the little fireball into a glass of tea, which puts out the flame. Then everyone drinks their tea.