Health

healthcare.gov

More than 250,000 people in the Carolinas have signed up for health insurance through the federal marketplace or exchange that's part of the Affordable Care Act. But there may not be enough young people signing up for the law to work as intended.


N.C. DHHS

Governor Pat McCrory's administration is changing course on its plan to overhaul North Carolina's most expensive health care program. Medicaid serves roughly 1.7 million low-income parents, children, seniors and people with disabilities. McCrory had rolled out a plan that some called a privatization scheme. Now, state leaders are finalizing details on a different approach that they'll present to the General Assembly by March 17.


In earlier versions of this story we mistakenly referred to Medicare expansion.  It should have been Medicaid expansion.

On Monday, lawmakers in Raleigh were given an assessment of the state’s ability to treat those with mental illness and those seeking treatment for addiction.  And that assessment was not good. 

They are on store shelves, advertised on television, and in the medicine cabinets of more than 50 percent of Americans. Some make dubious health claims and are largely unregulated by the FDA - tens of thousands of herbal and dietary supplements - from everyday vitamins and herbs to body-building and weight loss pills. A new study indicates that some of these supplements are linked to liver disease, liver failure and even an increased risk of death. They are not approved for safety and effectiveness by the FDA, and in fact, are only removed from the market after there has been a death or other evidence of injury from a product. It's been called the 'Wild West' and some people want that to change. We'll talk about what these supplements are, their potential health consequences and what you need to know to properly evaluate them - with a lead researcher of the study and a representative from the FDA.

In the Carolinas, there was a massive increase in enrollment last month in the federal health insurance marketplace or exchange that's part of the Affordable Care Act. That's according to federal data released Monday.


We are faced with so many food choices these days, especially processed foods, that it's easy to eat badly. Unhealthy eating and other lifestyle choices can lead to the development of diabetes. Carolinas Healthcare System and the YMCA recognized the rise in North Carolinians with Diabetes and an even larger number of folks at risk for developing the condition. They have introduced a program to help everyone recognize the signs of diabetes, take steps to avoid developing it and to learn to maintain, and in some case, reverse the effects. CHS and the YMCA are out to raise diabetes awareness and we'll learn too.

Michael Tomsic

Carolinas HealthCare System and Novant Health insist they need more beds to treat patients in Mecklenburg County. They made their cases to the state during a public meeting Tuesday in Charlotte. But the state won't let them both get as many beds as they want.


Novant Health and Carolinas HealthCare System are running out of room at two of their hospitals in Mecklenburg County, so both systems are asking the state if they can add more inpatient beds. The state is holding a public hearing on that Tuesday morning.


healthcare.gov

In the Carolinas, November was a far better month than October for the federal marketplace that's part of the Affordable Care Act. That's according to data the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released Wednesday.


North Carolina's proposed Medicaid overhaul may change significantly. That's the message from an advisory group the governor and legislature put together, which met for the first time Thursday.


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