Health

Ways to Connect

Michael Tomsic

Almost all children who survive cancer have at least one chronic health condition when they’re adults, and those conditions are often serious and undiagnosed.

Those are among the findings of a study that St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital released this summer. Some of the survivors who took part in it live in the Charlotte area.

Charles Landis still has the X-rays from when he was six years old. At his house in Cornelius, he pulls one out of a folder.

“This is an old X-ray from 1977,” Landis said.     

Cancer drug makers should do a much better job explaining how their new products will impact patients' symptoms and quality of life. That's the message from a UNC doctor in a recent online piece in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Ethan Basch of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center says whenever he meets with patients, one of their first questions is about how a certain drug will make them feel. 

The North Carolina Senate passed a bill Wednesday with new restrictions and regulations for abortion clinics. Republicans behind the bill say those are necessary steps for women's safety. WFAE's Michael Tomsic looked into that claim.


Eat like a caveman. That's what some doctors are recommending. Stick to lean meats, fruits and vegetables. Cut out refined grains and sugar. Dr. Philip Goscienski is one of them, the "Stone Age Doc" says our cavemen ancestors had the right idea and if we followed the simple ways they lived by, we'd live healthier, longer lives. We'll talk with him about that and meet the founder of a local company who's helping people do just that. Is "paleo" an effective movement towards a healthier life or the oldest fad diet of all time? And in a fast-food, pre-packaged world, can we really cut out sugar and grains? We go back to the cave, when Charlotte Talks.

Michael Tomsic

Starting next week, Mecklenburg County’s public health department will once again be run by the county. Carolinas HealthCare System has staffed and operated that department for about 18 years. It provides a wide variety of services, including flu shots, cancer screenings and health care in CMS schools.


N.C. Insurance Companies Pay $10 Million In Rebates

Jun 20, 2013

Almost 200,000 North Carolinians will get reimbursed a tiny portion of what they paid in health insurance premiums last year. Insurance companies will pay back an average of $87 per family because of a requirement in the Affordable Care Act.


County Budget Will Likely Include More School Nurses

Jun 17, 2013
JEFF WILLHELM - jwillhelm@charlotteobserver.com / Charlotte Observer

Mecklenburg County Commissioners are scheduled to pass a new budget Tuesday. A group of parents has spent the past year pushing for one line in that budget to increase – funding for school nurses.


Longtime public radio hosts Joe and Terry Graedon of the People's Pharmacy join us today. They've been on a mission for more than 30 years to educate listeners about their health. The Graedon's are in Charlotte this week for several events where they'll speak about "Tapping Grandma's Wisdom"- home remedies and healthy living. Joe and Terry Graedon join us to discuss health, home remedies and take your health questions, when Charlotte Talks.

About 1.5 million North Carolinians rely on Medicaid for health care. It's a massive program that costs the state about $36 million a day. And it may be about to change dramatically. Governor Pat McCrory is pushing for an overhaul that some say would privatize the program. We'll examine what's working in the current model – what's not – and what the overhaul would mean for North Carolina, when Charlotte Talks.

We are now nearly half way through a pivotal year for the implementation of important aspects of the Affordable Care act. Many doctors, administrators and patients are being affected by these changes and the results are somewhat mixed. Two people in the trenches of healthcare weigh in on the current state of the ACA in our state and the nation. One is an economist and the other a practicing physician and both say that health care "justice" is still far from reality. We'll look at the concept of "healthcare justice," what it means and whether it's possible.

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