Election

A special state legislative committee has approved a new Congressional district map that would dramatically alter district lines, including those that include Charlotte. The changes are required after a federal court found North Carolina’s 1st and 12th districts unconstitutional.

The Joint Select Committee on Congressional Redistricting voted 24-11 along party lines in favor of the map, which was redrawn by Republicans. It now goes to the full General Assembly, which Gov. Pat McCrory has called into a special session Thursday beginning at 10 a.m.

Courtesy of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

The CMS school board will have one new member.  Elyse Dashew will join incumbents Ericka Ellis-Stewart and Mary McCray on the board as an at-large member. 

  Dashew just missed winning a school board seat four years ago. This time around she received the second- highest number of votes.  Dashew has long been involved in education matters. She helped lead groups pushing for more school nurses and higher funding for CMS. 

Courtesy of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board has some big decisions to make over the next year.  Who should be the next superintendent?  How should new boundaries for schools be drawn?  We put those questions and others to the nine candidates running for three at-large seats on the board.  

Tom Bullock / WFAE

The race for mayor of Charlotte is down to three candidates. Former city councilman Edwin Peacock will represent the Republican Party in the general election. He’ll have to wait a few more weeks to find out whether his opponent will be Jennifer Roberts or incumbent Dan Clodfelter.

The Democratic Mayoral Primary

Flickr/Vox Efx

Polls open today for the 2015 municipal election primaries. Normally these are relatively low key affairs. But this year we’ve already seen three new records set.  

voting booths
santheo / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Early voting begins Thursday for local government elections, and many North Carolina voters may be surprised to hear they can register and vote at the same time. That's because some changes from the state's 2013 election overhaul are on hold as lawsuits play out.

North Carolina may not require voters to have a photo ID after all starting next year. That is, if you have a good reason for not having one.  A bill is headed to the governor’s desk that allows people without a photo ID some leeway.

Denise Cross Photography

North Carolina voters will need to take a photo ID along with them to the polls next year.  That ID must by law reasonably resemble the person. The State Board of Election has drafted rules to lay out what that means and is holding public hearings on them across the state, including one in Charlotte Monday night. 

Several voting rights groups accused Governor Pat McCrory's administration Friday of violating a federal law that requires public assistance agencies to help register voters. The groups are largely the same ones that made similar allegations against Governor Mike Easley's administration about 10 years ago, and then worked with the state to resolve the problems.

ncleg.net

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative districts, it's still unclear whether those districts are constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday tossed out the North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling in December that upheld the redistricting. The nation's highest court is ordering the state court to reconsider the case in light of a similar Alabama case it recently decided.

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