Election

voting booths
santheo / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Early voting begins Thursday for local government elections, and many North Carolina voters may be surprised to hear they can register and vote at the same time. That's because some changes from the state's 2013 election overhaul are on hold as lawsuits play out.

North Carolina may not require voters to have a photo ID after all starting next year. That is, if you have a good reason for not having one.  A bill is headed to the governor’s desk that allows people without a photo ID some leeway.

Denise Cross Photography

North Carolina voters will need to take a photo ID along with them to the polls next year.  That ID must by law reasonably resemble the person. The State Board of Election has drafted rules to lay out what that means and is holding public hearings on them across the state, including one in Charlotte Monday night. 

Several voting rights groups accused Governor Pat McCrory's administration Friday of violating a federal law that requires public assistance agencies to help register voters. The groups are largely the same ones that made similar allegations against Governor Mike Easley's administration about 10 years ago, and then worked with the state to resolve the problems.

ncleg.net

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative districts, it's still unclear whether those districts are constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday tossed out the North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling in December that upheld the redistricting. The nation's highest court is ordering the state court to reconsider the case in light of a similar Alabama case it recently decided.

Flickr/AndyCarvin

Two parts of North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul are now back on hold. But the change likely doesn't mean much because there are no elections between now and the full trial on the overhaul.

N.C. Board of Elections

A federal appeals court ruled in October that some North Carolina voting changes would result in irreparable harm to African-Americans. The U.S. Supreme Court overruled, and allowed the changes to be part of this year's elections. Now lawyers involved in the ongoing case have new data to work with – the state Board of Elections released a final breakdown of turnout Tuesday.

Jonathan Cox / C

Senator-elect Thom Tillis got right to the point Wednesday, after defeating incumbent US Sen. Kay Hagan (D-North Carolina) by a narrow margin of 1.68 percentage points Tuesday: He wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act, approve the Keystone XL Pipeline and act on other Republican issues that had been stalled in the Democrat-led Senate. 

NC General Assembly

Republicans are maintaining their supermajority in the North Carolina state legislature. That means they can continue to easily bypass Democratic opposition and override the governor's vetoes.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Mecklenburg County voters did not approve a quarter cent sales tax that would have gone mostly to raise CMS employee pay.  Sixty-one percent of voters said 'no' to that.  

The sales tax didn’t have much organized opposition.  The idea just didn’t take. It lost in precincts throughout the county, save for one in Davidson and a few neighborhoods just southeast of uptown. 

A group called Together 4 Meck sprung into action to advocate for the tax.

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