Election

A voter registration mailing sent by an arm of the conservative group Americans for Prosperity has prompted hundreds of calls to the North Carolina Board of Elections.

Many were addressed to dead people, under-age children, even a cat. They also contained some incorrect information. For example, the mailers told people they needed to register at least thirty days before the election. In North Carolina they have until October 10, 25 days before the election.    

The Republican state Senate candidate in Wilmington is likely to spend a few months in the job before he faces his Democratic opponent in the November election. The New Hanover County GOP nominated Michael Lee to fill out the remainder of State Senator Thom Goolsby's term. Goolsby resigned last week. 

State law essentially requires Governor Pat McCrory to now appoint Lee to fill out the remainder of Goolsby's Senate term.

Goolsby has called for Lee to replace him, and said he was resigning early to give the Republican candidate a "running start" in the legislature. 

Imagine the nasty notes you’d receive if you were four weeks late on your rent or mortgage.

If a pregnancy went four weeks long doctors would induce labor.

But if you’re a lawmaker, or a whole group of them in Raleigh, and your budget is four weeks late as of today, well…

So what is taking the pressure off lawmakers to get a budget deal done?

Unless you’ve spent your summer on a desert island with a volleyball named Wilson you know the issues holding up the budget are teacher pay, teaching assistants and Medicaid payments.

A federal judge will decide within the next month or two whether to put some parts of North Carolina's sweeping election law on hold. All week in Winston-Salem, the U.S. Justice Department, the NAACP, and other groups tried to convince Judge Thom Schroeder that the changes would deny or curtail African-Americans' right to vote. WFAE's Michael Tomsic covered the hearings in Winston-Salem, which wrapped up Thursday.

  In Winston-Salem this morning, a federal judge will continue questioning U.S. Justice Department lawyers on whether North Carolina's election overhaul violates the Voting Rights Act. All week, Judge Thom Schroeder has heard the Justice Department try to make that case, along with the NAACP, the League of Women Voters and other groups. They're suing North Carolina, and this week they're trying to convince a judge to put the changes on hold.

WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been in Winston-Salem covering the hearings.

Flickr/Vox Efx

Lawyers for the U.S. Justice Department will be back in a federal courtroom in Winston-Salem this morning to continue making their case that North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul is discriminatory. The hearings that began Monday morning have included personal stories of voting challenges, allegations of voter fraud, and even a 25-minute math exercise. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been in Winston-Salem covering the hearings.

The U.S. Justice Department is arguing before a federal judge in Winston-Salem this week that North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul will deny or curtail African-Americans' right to vote. The Justice Department and civil rights groups are asking the judge to put the changes on hold.

Reverend Milton Williams was among dozens of people stuck in line outside the courthouse, unable to get into the packed hearing.

NC State Republican Party

Jun 19, 2014

After a century in the minority, the North Carolina Republican party seized power in 2010.  Since then, the party has been busy establishing a brand and advancing their agenda. With a Republican governor and resources from national groups, we'll talk with a leader of the state party about the midterm elections and their hopes for the state.

United States Democratic Party

Midterm election season is in full swing. In North Carolina education reform and a pay raise for teachers is being hotly debated. Renewal of a large film incentive package is on the table, calls for infrastructure spending is rising and there are extremely tight races in districts all over the state. Several scandals have emerged, challenging both parties' images. Money is pouring in from outside of North Carolina with plenty of national interest on some local races. Against that backdrop we will talk to officials in the state Democratic and Republican parties in successive weeks. First up, the Democrats. 

By now you may have heard Thom Tillis is running for U.S. Senate. With the short legislative session beginning in Raleigh today, he also returns to his political day job, Speaker of the House. This sets up an interesting ethical question.

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