Education

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Updated 10:13 a.m. Aug. 8
Charlotte School of Law said last week it expects to offer students federal loans again in time for the fall semester. To do that, the school has to agree to certain conditions from the U.S. Department of Education. We now have a better idea of what those conditions are.  

Mecklenburg County commissioners Wednesday formally approved a Nov. 7 referendum on $922 million in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools bonds and set a public hearing for Sept. 5. 

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law expects to offer federal loans to students for the fall semester. But to stay open, it must convince its state licensor the school is financially stable. That deadline is Tuesday.  

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

CMS’ third lottery for magnet school programs ended last month and district officials say applications are up by 35 percent from last year. The district made changes to the lottery for the magnet program this year to create more diversity at these schools, but it didn’t change things much.

Julie Schoonmaker / Duke University

Duke University’s year old union that represents adjunct faculty and non-tenured full time faculty may have a victory in the making. Votes are still being cast but union members are confident that their contract with the school will be ratified. The contract calls for raises and provisions for job security.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

Monday was Clayton Wilcox’s first full day on the job as CMS superintendent. He was sworn in that morning after spending almost four months learning how the district operates and observing the often contentious student assignment plan process.

Charlotte School of Law is in the Charlotte Plaza Building at 201 S. College St.
Charlotte School of Law

Charlotte School of Law’s future looks bleaker as officials struggle to meet an August 10 deadline to show it’s financially strong and academically sound. The deadline was issued Wednesday by a UNC Board of Governor’s committee. If it's not met, the school’s license could be revoked.

Raising The Dropout Age Shows Varied Results

Jun 21, 2017
Christopher Sessums / Flickr

In North Carolina, you can legally drop out of high school at the age of 16 – except in two school districts in Catawba County – Newton-Conover City Schools and Hickory Public Schools. Both were given permission to raise the dropout age to 18 three years ago as part of a pilot program. These districts have seen some success, but they don’t owe it all to raising the dropout age. 

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

An after school program that serves low-income students may be cut if the Trump Administration has its way.  

Lisa Worf / WFAE

CMS now has a student assignment plan after a 6 1/2 hour meeting that was often contentious.

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