Education

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board members voted 7-2 Tuesday night to increase support for LGBTQ students by expanding the district’s multiculturalism policy. The vote followed a public hearing on the matter that was heated and, at times, combative. 

elementary school students
Lisa Worf / WFAE

It’s not clear if North Carolina lawmakers convening in special session this week will address the k-3 reduced class size legislation. But Wake County Democrat Rep. Jay Chaudhouri says he plans to introduce a bill Wednesday that returns the maximum number of students allowed in classes in those grades to 24.

Submitted

A senior at Queens University in Charlotte who raised awareness of students who are veterans on campus was named the 2018 Student Veteran of the Year. The Student Veterans of America awarded 25-year-old Chris Rolph the honor at its conference in San Antonio this weekend.

Governor Roy Cooper visited this second grade class at Cotswold Elementary School which would have to make changes to comply with the smaller K-3 class size mandate.
Alex Olgin / WFAE

Governor Roy Cooper was in Charlotte Friday to make his pitch to lawmakers to give schools more money to implement smaller class sizes. He visited with second graders at Cotswold Elementary School. Legislators mandated that elementary schools get kindergarten through third grade classes below 18 students by next school year. While Cooper thinks the idea could improve learning, he said the current plan puts schools in a tough situation because no extra money has been dedicated.

Union County Rep. Craig Horn (standing) talks to CMS officials at legislative breakfast about his efforts to tweak the reduced classroom size legislation for K-3.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

CMS officials met with the local delegation of state lawmakers Thursday and it was testy at times. The discussion centered on legislation lawmakers approved that would reduce class sizes for students in kindergarten through third grade; and a bill being considered that would allow the towns of Mint Hill and Matthews to use property taxes to run their own charter school.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Johnson C. Smith University was placed on probation last week by its accreditation agency. This week that agency released a bit more information about why it made that decision. It cited concerns about the school’s financial stability and control of its resources. But there are still a lot of questions. Smith officials are playing the probation down, saying they expect to clear it up soon. They, too, are not providing any specifics.

WFAE

Johnson C. Smith University's accrediting agency has placed the school on probation.


Gwendolyn Glenn

During segregation, many all-black public schools had roles beyond being a place to get a diploma. They were used for celebrations like wedding receptions and dances. Sometimes they were secretly used by community leaders to plan strategies or hide activists from lynch mobs.

JCSU

Johnson C. Smith University has received $1.8 million in grants to expand its STEM program and expose students at two schools in west Charlotte to computer science and other forms of technology.

WFAE file photo

The Beacon technology blog is offering k-12 teachers a chance to compete for six grants that they can use to buy supplies and materials for technological-related classroom instruction. The grant awards range from $500 to $1,000.

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