Michael Tomsic

The Charlotte Mecklenburg School board will soon have two new people with the last name of Bailey. Matthews Mayor Pro-Tem Paul Bailey swept district six, which covers southern Mecklenburg county, receiving 60 percent of the vote.  He said voters wanted someone who is a good collaborator. 

Hundreds of Charlotte Mecklenburg School students could have more schools to choose from next year.  They include classes on college campuses and another Montessori magnet.  Tuesday night, CMS officials rolled out plans for the new programs.   

Courtesy of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

Five CMS district seats are up for grabs this election.  Current board members say they’ve seen the board through difficult financial times and are eager to forge ahead with a new superintendent. Their challengers say there’s room for improvement.  WFAE together with MeckEd will hold a public forum with eleven of the candidates this Thursday evening. The moderator of the event is WFAE’s Lisa Miller. She joins Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt for a preview. 

KK:  So one big difference from the last election is we have a different superintendent. 

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools start and end times have made for some heated debate since the district added 45 minutes to the elementary school day.  Superintendent Heath Morrison says he’s not willing to shorten the day by much.

Two years ago, CMS officials lengthened the school day for elementary students to seven hours and pushed dismissals at many schools to 4:15.  With those adjustments one bus could serve more schools. 

Atty. General Says He'll Challenge Gov. McCrory

Oct 6, 2013

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper told Democratic Party activists Saturday he’ll run for governor in three years.  Appearing Saturday at the Democrats’ Western Gala in Asheville, Cooper said it's too early to make a formal announcement, but he’s ready to challenge first-term Republican Governor Pat McCrory.

Standardized testing is nothing new in schools, but over the last several years the amount of it has significantly increased as the push for accountability has picked up. 

The state of North Carolina now administers 49 exams to students.  Some people in high positions have joined the backlash against all this testing and now the state is looking at ways to ease up a bit. 

Lisa Miller

Schools often try to get parents more involved in their children’s education.  Mothers tend to be the ones who heed the call.  For whatever reason, you don’t see many fathers around school.  Across the country, there are efforts to change that. 

Advocates say a father’s presence helps convince kids school is important and makes sure they keep to the straight and narrow.  A few schools around Charlotte have begun recruiting dads to help out at school. 

Lisa Miller

Hundreds of teachers in masters programs have a dilemma.  They’ve paid thousands of dollars for courses thinking it will pay off with a 10 percent automatic pay hike.  But North Carolina lawmakers eliminated that this year, so only teachers who get their masters before the cutoff date next year will still get the salary increase. 

Republican Representative Bill Brawley of Matthews said at a Charlotte Observer forum this week he’ll push to extend that cutoff date. 

Lisa Miller

Next year North Carolina teachers will no longer get a 10 percent automatic pay hike for earning their master’s degrees.  So the race is on for those teachers in graduate programs right now. Universities are trying to give them every chance to complete their master’s degree before the cutoff date for pay increases next year. 

Lisa Miller

Students at nine schools in west Charlotte got special escorts to their classrooms today.  Fathers, grandfathers and uncles dropped children off at school as part of a national effort called the Million Father March to get fathers and other male mentors involved in the lives of students. 

Dontay Kilgo brought his son to his first day of pre-k at Druid Hills Academy.  About 25 other men dropped their children off at the school too.