CMS

Lisa Worf

Republican leaders of the General Assembly say they have reached a deal to give school districts statewide more time to reduce class sizes for kindergarten through third grades.

The proposal, which still needs approval, also includes more money to keep art, music and physical education teachers in the classroom.

All this is good news for North Carolina's public schools.  

But it comes with some controversial political strings attached.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board members voted 7-2 Tuesday night to increase support for LGBTQ students by expanding the district’s multiculturalism policy. The vote followed a public hearing on the matter that was heated and, at times, combative. 

elementary school students
Lisa Worf / WFAE

It’s not clear if North Carolina lawmakers convening in special session this week will address the k-3 reduced class size legislation. But Wake County Democrat Rep. Jay Chaudhouri says he plans to introduce a bill Wednesday that returns the maximum number of students allowed in classes in those grades to 24.

Union County Rep. Craig Horn (standing) talks to CMS officials at legislative breakfast about his efforts to tweak the reduced classroom size legislation for K-3.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

CMS officials met with the local delegation of state lawmakers Thursday and it was testy at times. The discussion centered on legislation lawmakers approved that would reduce class sizes for students in kindergarten through third grade; and a bill being considered that would allow the towns of Mint Hill and Matthews to use property taxes to run their own charter school.

WSOC-TV

Bus 188 was leaving a CMS bus lot on Tuesday to pick up its daily load of students and deliver them home, when the driver smelled smoke.

The bus, an FS-26 Freightliner built in 2001 by Thomas Built Buses, had just been inspected in October, with nothing found amiss.

Diedra Laird / The Charlotte Observer

The nearly $1 billion school bond package that goes before voters in November is getting a lot of push back from residents in North Mecklenburg. Huntersville and Cornelius town commissioners recently voted to oppose the bond and the Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce is against it as well.

The Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce joins Huntersville and Cornelius town commissions in opposing the nearly $1 billion dollar bond package for Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools. 

  The Cornelius Board of Commissioners has joined Huntersville in opposing the nearly $1 billion bond package for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. The Cornelius board voted 4- 1 Monday night to oppose the bond.

A majority of commissioners say the bond does not provide sufficient new schools to accommodate growth in North Mecklenburg.

A new report released by an early childhood education advocacy group, found that 44 percent of elementary schools in North Carolina had chronic absenteeism rates of between 10 percent and 19 percent. That means these students missed 15 or more days of school in a year.

Mechelle Vaughn

In July, WFAE’s Charlotte Talks held a public conversation on the city’s escalating murder rate. CMPD Chief Kerr Putney and other panelists talked about how there’s a lot of anger in people that has roots in their very early years. That made second-grade teacher Mechelle Vaughn stand up and say what she sees in her classroom.

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