CMPD

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police say they've charged 51-year-old Antonio Gaines for his involvement in a sexual assault that occurred 24 years ago near uptown Charlotte.

Police say the assault took place on April 23, 1993. A woman was kidnapped and sexually assaulted by several men in the 400 block of Caldwell Street. The police department collected and analyzed evidence of the crime, but were unable to identify any suspects.

The CMPD Sexual Assault Cold Case Unit reopened the investigation and re-examined DNA evidence, leading to confirmation of Gaines as a suspect in Jan. 2017.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney speaks at a press conference on April 27, 2017. Putney addressed the use of force shown in bodycam footage from a March 2016 arrest.
Molly Mathis / Charlotte Observer

CMPD Police Chief Kerr Putney says he will not defend the actions of a police officer who tackled a suspect, pressed a gun to his head, and said "I will kill you," while making an arrest last year. Still, Putney says the officer's actions were legal.

Map shows unincorporated areas in Mecklenburg County.
Mecklenburg County

Mecklenburg County commissioners have voted to terminate a contract with the City of Charlotte for police coverage in the county's unincorporated areas. They hope Tuesday night’s unanimous vote will persuade the city to let Huntersville and other towns police areas outside their town limits.

The Police Foundation review team at Wednesday's meeting, from left: chief operating officer Blake Norton, Roberto Villasenor, Frank Straub, and the Rev. Jeffrey Brown.
David Boraks / WFAE

A team of outside reviewers is in Charlotte this week to begin examining procedures and community relations at Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department. The Police Foundation's first public meeting Wednesday night was billed as a "listening session," but there were lots of questions, too.

Charlotte police say a possible hate crime incident in which a threatening letter was left outside a Nepali-Indian grocery store last week signed "White America" has led to the arrest of a black man.

Demonstrators line up by the convention center.
David Boraks / WFAE

The police killing of Keith Scott last September brought several nights of sometimes violent demonstrations uptown. So Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police hired a consultant to examine their operations and community relations. This week, reviewers from The Police Foundation of Washington, DC, make their first visit, with a public meeting Wednesday night. 

Dr. David Jacobs, a violence prevention specialist at Carolinas HealthCare System, offered crime data at the start of Friday's conference, at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church on Beatties Ford Road.
David Boraks / WFAE

Twenty-seven people have been murdered in Charlotte since the start of the year. That's about double the number a year ago, and mirrors a local and national trend of growth in violent crime. Experts are trying to understand why, and more importantly, what to do about it. WFAE reporter David Boraks was at a conference on Youth Violence Prevention Friday in Charlotte and talked with WFAE’s Lisa Worf.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police say they plan to bring murder charges against the girlfriend of a man already accused in the shooting deaths of his parents in east Charlotte Sunday. The pair also face kidnapping charges after fleeing to Washington, D.C., with the man's 11-year-old niece.

CMPD Capt. Cecil Brisbon talks about the spike in murders in Charlotte this year at Wednesday's weekly police briefing.
David Boraks / WFAE

Random shootings aren’t what’s driving the tripling of murders in Charlotte this year. Charlotte Mecklenburg Police say it’s usually an argument between people who know each other that escalates into a fatal shooting. Twenty-two people have been murdered in the city since Jan. 1. 

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

In any given month, CMPD tracks about 350 people with ankle monitors. They’re actually not that hard to remove. But the consequences of tampering with the electronic monitors are made clear: If you even try to remove any part of one, police are immediately alerted, and you will be arrested. And, this happens a lot – roughly 80 times a year.

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