Charlotte School of Law

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law and its parent company Infilaw are the subjects of many recent lawsuits filed by former students. But now there's one filed by a professor in June of 2016. It had been under seal for more than a year because the federal government was investigating her allegations. The lawsuit says the now-closed school defrauded taxpayers out of $285 million by accepting unqualified students, manipulating grades and pursuing other methods to keep failing students enrolled – all in an effort to continue to collect tuition paid through federal loans.

Charlotte School of Law entrance
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Charlotte School of Law is closed after eight months of fighting to stay open.  The North Carolina Attorney General's Office said Tuesday the for-profit school can no longer operate and, if it tries to, the department will force it to shut down. That's because the school's license has expired. 

Charlotte School of Law entrance
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Charlotte School of Law is closing. That's after its license expired last week and the American Bar Association denied the school's plan to move forward. The North Carolina Attorney General's Office said today the school can't operate and, if it does, it will force it to close.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Updated 10:13 a.m. Aug. 8
Charlotte School of Law said last week it expects to offer students federal loans again in time for the fall semester. To do that, the school has to agree to certain conditions from the U.S. Department of Education. We now have a better idea of what those conditions are.  

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law expects to offer federal loans to students for the fall semester. But to stay open, it must convince its state licensor the school is financially stable. That deadline is Tuesday.  

Charlotte School of Law is in the Charlotte Plaza Building at 201 S. College St.
Charlotte School of Law

Charlotte School of Law’s future looks bleaker as officials struggle to meet an August 10 deadline to show it’s financially strong and academically sound. The deadline was issued Wednesday by a UNC Board of Governor’s committee. If it's not met, the school’s license could be revoked.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law is on probation with the American Bar Association, has had its federal loan money yanked by the Department of Education and now it's in trouble with its state licensor, the UNC Board of Governors. 

The board decided yesterday to give the law school until August 1st to prove that it's financially sound and in compliance with state licensure standards.  That includes providing proof of a guaranty bond that would refund students' tuition if the school closed mid-semester.

Paul Megget will become Charlotte School of Law's third dean in as many months. Meanwhile, the Mecklenburg County Commission has approved two budget plans, one a $1.7 billion operating budget for FY2018, the other a $1.5 billion long-term capital improvement plan. And, the proposed North Carolina state budget continues to move quickly through the General Assembly.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Charlotte School of Law students graduated Saturday, after winding down their final exams. 

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law students will graduate Saturday. Many wondered if this day would ever come – not because law school is so tough, but because it wasn't clear whether the for-profit school would still exist after the department of education yanked its federal loan money in December.

But Charlotte School of Law is still fighting to stay open and its graduating class will soon be preparing for the bar and trying not to let the school's troubles hurt their career prospects.

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