Charlotte School of Law

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

There was a bit of movement on the future of Charlotte School of Law over the weekend. The school says it plans to stay open until the end of 2019, so that its current students can graduate from the school. It's not clear what would happen after that. The only problem is that the Department of Education refuses to grant federal loans to any of the school's students. Charlotte School of Law is banking on a new administration to reverse that decision.  Joining All Things Considered Host Mark Rumsey is Lisa Worf.   

MR: So what's the school's plan to gradually wind down?

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law students are wrapping up their second week back to classes after the Department of Education yanked all federal loans to the school. The school has refused to close and that decision means students can't have their debt forgiven.  WFAE's Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey now:

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Last week, we reported that the troubled Charlotte School of Law paid graduates deemed at-risk to delay taking the bar and enroll in a bar preparation course. This program came about a few years ago as it had become the state’s largest law school with the poorest record of graduates passing the bar.

Today, WFAE’s Lisa Worf reports on secret recordings of a law school official that shed light on how much the deferral program inflated bar passage statistics.

Charlotte School of Law

The Charlotte School of Law has drawn scrutiny in part because of the low percentage of students who have passed the state bar in the last few years. It has consistently had the lowest pass rate in North Carolina, and ranks among the worst in the country.

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

It became apparent about three years ago that Charlotte School of Law had a dilemma. The for-profit school that opened in 2006 had admitted too many unqualified students. Many failed out and others who graduated couldn't pass the bar. That bar passage rate is an important way to recruit new students and one of the reasons it came under scrutiny by its accreditor the American Bar Association. So Charlotte School of Law leaders came up with a creative solution. 

Julie Rose / WFAE

Charlotte School of Law is not planning to enroll any new students this coming semester and it's unclear classes will resume for current students.

Two students at the for-profit Charlotte School of Law are seeking class action status for a federal lawsuit against the troubled school.  

Julie Rose / WFAE

As of January 1, the Charlotte School of Law can no longer receive any federal loan money. In making the decision, the U.S. Department of Education says the law school has long been out of compliance with ABA standards and gave no hint of those problems to students.

Julie Rose / WFAE

The for-profit, Charlotte School of Law’s accreditation is in jeopardy. This week, the American Bar Association put the school, the state’s largest law school with about 800 students, on probation over concerns that unqualified students were being admitted and that too many graduates were not passing the bar exam.

The Charlotte School of Law has been placed on probation by the American Bar Association, effective November 14. The association says the law school has been admitting students who were incapable of completing the program or passing the Bar exam, and thus has been inadequate in preparing students for careers as lawyers.

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