Charlotte School of Law

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Charlotte School of Law students graduated Saturday, after winding down their final exams. 

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law students will graduate Saturday. Many wondered if this day would ever come – not because law school is so tough, but because it wasn't clear whether the for-profit school would still exist after the department of education yanked its federal loan money in December.

But Charlotte School of Law is still fighting to stay open and its graduating class will soon be preparing for the bar and trying not to let the school's troubles hurt their career prospects.

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law students got some promising news today, a week before graduation: their federal loan money may actually come through for this semester. 

Charlotte School of Law is now under investigation by the North Carolina Attorney General's Office. NC DOJ spokeswoman Laura Brewer says the office is investigating the school under the state's civil consumer protection laws and is "very concerned about the current situation" there. 

Charlotte School of Law

Charlotte School of Law Interim Dean Scott Broyles has resigned after less than a month on the job. Many students and faculty had viewed him as the last hope in saving the for-profit school. Broyles says it became increasingly clear that his role wasn't producing any good effect for the students.

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law is on its way to becoming a non-profit. It's part of the plan to get the law school's federal loan money re-instated. WFAE's Lisa Worf has been following the school's struggles since the American Bar Association placed the law school on probation this past fall. She joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry. 

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

There was a bit of movement on the future of Charlotte School of Law over the weekend. The school says it plans to stay open until the end of 2019, so that its current students can graduate from the school. It's not clear what would happen after that. The only problem is that the Department of Education refuses to grant federal loans to any of the school's students. Charlotte School of Law is banking on a new administration to reverse that decision.  Joining All Things Considered Host Mark Rumsey is Lisa Worf.   

MR: So what's the school's plan to gradually wind down?

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law students are wrapping up their second week back to classes after the Department of Education yanked all federal loans to the school. The school has refused to close and that decision means students can't have their debt forgiven.  WFAE's Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey now:

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Last week, we reported that the troubled Charlotte School of Law paid graduates deemed at-risk to delay taking the bar and enroll in a bar preparation course. This program came about a few years ago as it had become the state’s largest law school with the poorest record of graduates passing the bar.

Today, WFAE’s Lisa Worf reports on secret recordings of a law school official that shed light on how much the deferral program inflated bar passage statistics.

Charlotte School of Law

The Charlotte School of Law has drawn scrutiny in part because of the low percentage of students who have passed the state bar in the last few years. It has consistently had the lowest pass rate in North Carolina, and ranks among the worst in the country.

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