Charlotte budget

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The Charlotte Fraternal Order of Police is calling on city leaders to give officers more substantial raises, saying it would be a good first step in giving officers support that they feel has been lacking in recent months.

Charlotte skyline at dusk
silicon640c / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/

Charlotte's new city manager has released his proposed budget for the city. It calls for a 5.3 percent increase in city spending with no increase in property taxes. But residents would still pay more for water and garbage services.

Michael Tomsic

Charlotte residents had their first chance to comment Monday night on the city’s proposed budget, which includes a property tax hike. But most of the speakers focused on something that’s not in the budget.

Charlotte's city manager is recommending about a 1 percent property tax increase to fund more police and firefighters. Ron Carlee presented his budget to city council Monday night.

WFAE

WFAE's Tom Bullock sits in for both Lisa Worf and Ben Bradford. Tom and News Director Greg Collard discuss the city of Charlotte's $2.25 million settlement with the family of Jonathan Ferrell. He died in September 2013 after police officer Randall Kerrick shot him 10 times. The settlement comes about 2 months before Kerrick goes to trial (July 20) on a voluntary manslaughter charge. Greg and Tom also discuss budget decisions that will soon be made at the local and state levels, plus a legislative attempt to redraw some local election districts.

After another meeting to discuss the budget proposed by Charlotte city manager Ron Carlee, no clear consensus exists among the city council about a core component of the proposal: to raise property taxes while lowering overall costs for most residents.


Tom Bullock / WFAE News

Monday night was an open mic night of sorts at the Charlotte City Council. It was the public’s chance to have their say on the city manager’s proposed budget. It includes an increase in property taxes and cuts to city services. 

There wasn’t a flood of angry protesters lamenting cuts to the city’s 311 service last night. In fact just eight people spoke to the council last night. The speakers broke down into one of three categories.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

Charlotte city council members expressed mixed feelings about city manager Ron Carlee’s proposal to raise property taxes as part of the solution to the upcoming budget deficit.


charmeck.org

City Manager Ron Carlee has recommended the Charlotte City Council raise property taxes, as one part of a multi-faceted solution to deal with a budget gap larger than in any single year of the recession. But most homeowners would actually pay less, Carlee says.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Despite a growing economy, the city of Charlotte is facing a $21.7 million budget gap. City leaders say it’s bigger than anything they dealt with during the great recession. Tonight, City Manager Ron Carlee will lay out his plan to fill that gap when he proposes his budget before the city council.

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