Campaign Finance

When Right To Rise USA was formed last year, it was supposed to be a game changer. A Super PAC with a massive bank account created for one purpose, make Jeb Bush the 45th president of the United States.

Right to Rise has inundated Iowa, New Hampshire and now South Carolina with ads but so far the group may have authored a cautionary tale rather than the playbook for big money politics.

When Jeb Bush announced the launch of Right to Rise, it was a decidedly low tech affair recorded on a smart phone.

This election year, some savvy political donors will get a little something extra for their contribution: a tax deduction.

In a few cases this is perfectly legal. In others however, the legality is questionable at best.

All this is thanks to lax oversight, loopholes and, believe it or not, a single paragraph tucked into the 2,000 page federal budget passed late last year.

The Keith Corporation / State of North Carolina

A meeting and a strange memo were brought up again and again by state lawmakers Wednesday. The members of a joint legislative commission were looking into how and why a Charlotte businessman and McCrory campaign donor was awarded $3 million in state prison contracts. 

Carolina Rising

A national watchdog group has filed complaints with the IRS and the Federal Election Commission claiming a North Carolina nonprofit broke campaign finance laws during the 2014 election. That nonprofit was headed by the current executive director of the North Carolina Republican Party.

Campaign finance reports normally make news for dubious reasons like a controversial donor or questionable spending by candidates. It’s rare they make news for blunt honesty. Rare, but it does happen.

Last Friday was a big day for North Carolina politicians, whether they’re running for office this year or not. Anyone actively raising money for a campaign of any type had to file their finance reports for the first half of this year. They show amount of cash raised, amount of cash spent and what’s known as cash on hand.

Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

The State Board of Elections has ruled no laws were broken when an Oklahoma man with ties to illegal gambling gave $270,000 to the campaigns of leading North Carolina politicians.

Courtesy of the NCGA

State Senator Fletcher Hartsell may face criminal charges if the State Board of Elections has its way. It found between $100,000 and $300,000 in political contributions were used to finance Hartsell’s personal spending. On Wednesday, the board unanimously referred the case to state and federal prosecutors.

The director of a conservative political group is blaming administrative errors for mistakes in voter registration forms the organization mailed in recent weeks.  Donald Bryson is North Carolina's director of Americans for Prosperity Foundation, which mailed the forms. He said in a statement the forms had "minor administrative errors" and old information. 

By now you may have heard Thom Tillis is running for U.S. Senate. With the short legislative session beginning in Raleigh today, he also returns to his political day job, Speaker of the House. This sets up an interesting ethical question.

Money Pouring In As Senate Primary Approaches

Apr 17, 2014

North Carolina hosts one of the most watched electoral races in the country this year, as first-term Democratic Senator Kay Hagan is up for reelection. Who will win is already a toss-up, in a year where Republicans and Democrats are battling for control of the Senate. WFAE’s Ben Bradford joined Morning Edition Host Kevin Kniestedt to discuss the race.