Arts & Life

Education
12:07 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Asian-Americans Are Successful, But No Thanks To Tiger Parenting

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 12:24 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. This is Asian-American and Pacific Islander heritage month. That's a time set aside to acknowledge the contributions of people from these backgrounds to the bigger American story. Undeniably, when many Americans look for role models for educational achievement, many find them in Asian-American homes.

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Monkey See
9:51 am
Mon May 12, 2014

The Comb, The Thrill And The Flop

Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze's 1851 painting "Washington Crossing the Delaware" seen at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2012.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Saturday at about 10:30 in the morning, as New York took a turn for the muggy in what turned out to be anticipation of rain, I climbed the steps to the Metropolitan Museum Of Art and rented one of the audio guide units that hang around your neck on an orange strap. I stayed about five hours, wearing out the battery on the audio unit and turning it in for another, wandering from the Egyptian art into the Temple of Dendur, through European sculptures to Arms and Armor and the American Wing, through Oceania, Africa and the Americas.

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The Two-Way
8:49 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Book News: Author Of Invented Holocaust Memoir Ordered To Return $22.5 Million

Misha Defonseca sits during proceedings at Massachusetts' Middlesex Superior Court in 2008. Defonseca, the author of a fabricated Holocaust memoir, has been ordered to pay back $22.5 million to her publisher.
MARY SCHWALM AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Salt
4:07 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Why Take-And-Bake Pizza Is Giving The Tax Guys A Headache

Papa Murphy's is a chain that sells take-and-bake pizza. It built its name on low prices, and a willingness to accept food stamps. But now that may be in jeopardy.
Nicholas Eckhart Flickr

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 1:21 pm

In 24 states, a Hershey bar is candy but a Twix is not. That's because a Twix contains flour, and in those states — which all share a sales tax code — candy is defined as being flour-free. And since groceries aren't taxed, you'll pay tax for the Hershey but not for the Twix.

If that seems strange, consider the case of take-and-bake pizza — uncooked pies you take home and bake later. Take-and-bake is at the center of an ongoing tax-code debate. Many states consider it a grocery item, like eggs or flour. But now they're re-evaluating whether take-and-bake should be tax-free.

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Fine Art
3:23 am
Mon May 12, 2014

One Collector's Plan To Save Realistic Art Was Anything But Abstract

Two pensive women share a mysterious, intense moment in Raphael Soyer's 1980 Annunciation.
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 2:56 pm

Plenty of collectors want to donate artworks to museums, but the museums don't always welcome them with open arms. "We say 'no thanks' 19 times out of 20," says Betsy Broun, director at the American Art Museum. Sometimes the works aren't museum-quality, other times they don't fit with the museums' philosophy.

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Television
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Stand Up Planet' Follows Jokes To Serious Global Issues

As part of the documentary Stand Up Planet, South African comedian Mpho Popps (left) and Indian comedian Aditi Mittal (right) came to Los Angeles to perform with Hasan Minhaj at the Laugh Factory.
Courtesy of StandUpPlanet.org

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 9:45 am

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Author Interviews
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

For Artistic Criminal, Breaking Rules Is Key To 'Creativity'

Philippe Petit, a French high-wire artist, walks across a tightrope suspended between the World Trade Center towers in New York on Aug. 7, 1974.
Alan Welner AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 10:19 am

Philippe Petit says he hates books on creativity.

So his new book, Creativity: The Perfect Crime, isn't a compilation of ideas from great philosophers or creators.

The wirewalker, magician, street performer and artist breaks that mold with a book full of sketches and personal dialogue that captures his personal creative process.

And because it's so personal, he says, it will be more useful. "I'm not doing any rules. This is not a thesis on creativity. This is a kind of an outlaw confession," he tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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Author Interviews
2:12 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Insatiable': One Woman's Love Affair With The Porn Industry

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:03 am

Asa Akira had a happy childhood. The daughter of an upper middle-class family, she attended private schools in New York City and in Japan, where she lived for six years as a child.

"I'm from a very normal family," she tells NPR's Arun Rath. "My parents are still together; nothing dramatic or traumatic has ever happened to me."

After high school, as her peers started careers or went off to college, Akira decided to pursue her dream job: porn star.

Akira says even from an early age, she was both comfortable with her own sexuality and interested in the sex industry.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Portraits Of Mothers (And The Children Who Love Them)

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 1:14 pm

There are a few special days we relish watching unfold on social media. The first day of school is one. Mother's Day is another. We like them because social feeds are filled with photographs that gives us an intimate peek at a very special human connection that resonates across the globe.

On this mother's day, we looked sifted through Instagram and Twitter and pulled out some of our favorite images. Here they are, but before all of that: Happy Mother's Day!

Television
7:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

The Pains Of Parenting, And Other Life Lessons From Louis C.K.

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:49 am

Louis C.K. has made a career in comedy by going places others won't. He can be shockingly crude and deeply insightful in the same sentence.

In his Emmy-award winning TV show called Louie, the comedian basically plays himself — a divorced standup comic in New York with two kids. Season 4 of the show kicked off last week.

Louie is "right where I started him, really," he tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "Some stuff happened, but he ended up back where he was, which sort of is the way things work. It's a zero-sum game, at times."

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