Arts & Life

Fine Art
3:23 am
Mon December 10, 2012

Hopper's Lonely Figures Find Some Friends In Paris

Edward Hopper is well-known in the U.S. for paintings such as Nighthawks (1942)pensive, lonely portraits of people sitting together yet alone. He was less well-known in France, but an exhibit of his work at the Grand Palais has drawn impressive crowds.
The Art Institute of Chicago, Friends of American Art Collection Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 11:07 am

Earlier this summer, I looked for Edward Hopper's Morning Sun at its home in the Columbus Museum of Art in Ohio. In the painting, a woman sits on a bed with her knees up, gazing out a window. She's bare, but for a short pink slip. The iconic Hopper is a must-see, but on the day I visited, it was on loan to an exhibition in Madrid.

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Author Interviews
4:26 pm
Sun December 9, 2012

'Torn': Living As An Openly Gay Christian

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 12:50 pm

Justin Lee was raised in a conservative Southern Baptist home. He had two loving parents, and was deeply committed to his faith. In school, classmates even referred to him as "God Boy" because of his devotion.

But, as he was entering high school, Lee's whole world began to change, as he came face-to-face with feelings that he'd tried for many years to suppress.

"I didn't know I was gay at first, because I was the kid who was preaching against folks accepting themselves as gay," he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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Author Interviews
6:16 am
Sun December 9, 2012

Sebastian Faulks: Searching For The Self In 'Possible' Lives

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 5:37 pm

A young intelligence officer during the Second World War survives life in a Nazi concentration camp. A music producer in the 1970s falls in love with a young bohemian singer who breaks his heart. A lonely Italian neuroscientist makes a revolutionary discovery: Humans have no souls. These are some of the stories Sebastian Faulks weaves together in his latest novel, A Possible Life.

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Music Interviews
6:16 am
Sun December 9, 2012

40 Years On, 'Free To Be' Message Still Resonates

Actress Marlo Thomas has been gracing television screens since the 1960s and earned a Golden Globe for her role on That Girl in 1966.
Jemal Countess Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 2:36 pm

The children's album Free To Be... You and Me was the brainchild of Emmy-winning actress Marlo Thomas and a bevy of celebrity friends, from Michael Jackson to Rosey Grier, all the way to Carol Channing and Harry Belafonte.

It contained stories, skits and songs that were not your typical children's fare. On it, a football player sang a ballad titled "It's Alright to Cry." Another track featured a long-overdue explanation that housework isn't fun for anyone — mothers, fathers or children.

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Games & Humor
4:56 am
Sun December 9, 2012

Quick! Sneak In That 'QU'

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 2:36 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a six-letter word containing "QU" somewhere inside it. You'll be given anagrams of the remaining four letters. You name the words (No answer is a plural or a word formed by adding "s.").

Last week's challenge from listener Adam Cohen of Brooklyn, N.Y.: Name two articles of apparel — things you wear — which, when the words are used as verbs, are synonyms of each other. What are they?

Answer: Belt, sock

Winner: Jeanne Kelsey of Lamberton, Minn.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
5:04 pm
Sat December 8, 2012

The Movie Gustavo Santaolalla's 'Seen A Million Times'

Brad Pitt (left) and Laramie Eppler (right) in Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life.
Merie Wallace Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 6:51 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Movies
5:04 pm
Sat December 8, 2012

Knightley's Anna Karenina Loses The Innocence

Keira Knightley and director Joe Wright have worked together on three film adaptations of period novels.
Laurie Sparham Focus Features

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 7:00 pm

Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina has been adapted for TV or film at least 25 times. It's a title role made great by screen legends Greta Garbo and Vivian Leigh, and now, it's Keira Knightley's turn.

Knightley reunites with Pride and Prejudice director Joe Wright in a new adaptation of the book. Here, she talks to Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about bringing the title character to life.


Interview Highlights

On the opening sequence

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:19 am
Sat December 8, 2012

Hugh Bonneville Of 'Downton Abbey' Plays Not My Job

Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 12:42 pm

America is obsessed with Downton Abbey, the British series about a family so wealthy that they can't feed, clothe or care for themselves. Hugh Bonneville plays the patriarch of the family, and we've invited His Lordship to play a game we're calling, "Welcome to America, Lord Grantham."

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Movie Interviews
6:47 am
Sat December 8, 2012

50 Years On, Sharif Looks Back At 'Lawrence'

Sherif Ali (Omar Sharif) and T.E. Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) fight together in the 1962 epic.
Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 8:26 am

In one of the greatest movies of all time, a World War I-era Englishman played by Peter O'Toole stops with his Arab guide at a well in the desert. As they drink, they look into the distance and see a lone figure in black, galloping toward them on a camel. The Arab man recognizes him and draws a gun. The lone figure brings him down with a single musket shot. Now that's an entrance.

The man on the camel was Omar Sharif as Sherif Ali.

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Music News
6:47 am
Sat December 8, 2012

An Unlikely Youth Chorus Comes Together Online

Diana Newlon leads the OHDELA chorus from her Akron living room.
Molly Bloom StateImpact Ohio

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 10:09 am

Diana Newlon sits on her living-room couch leading choir practice. With her laptop balanced on one arm of the sofa, she looks at a screen full of videos of girls singing "Jingle Bell Rock." Each girl is in her own little square, arranged Brady Bunch-style on the screen.

Newlon teaches at the Ohio Distance and Electronic Learning Academy — OHDELA for short — and she's the founder of perhaps the only all-online school choir in the state, or even the nation.

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