Arts & Life

Arts & Life
11:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Photo Staff Firings Won't Shake Pulitzer Winner's Focus

The Chicago Sun-Times made a surprise announcement last week: it fired its entire photography staff. Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist John White worked there for more than forty years. He talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about what this news means for him personally and the future of photojournalism.

Barbershop
11:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Is It A Surprise That The Government Is Monitoring Your Calls?

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 4:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Monkey See
11:36 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Funny Moms And Funny Pages

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week's show pauses to appreciate the truly awesome Jean Stapleton, who recently died at 90 years old. We recall her work as Edith Bunker and connect her to many other sitcom moms, from Mrs. Cunningham to Mrs. Cleaver to Jill Taylor and Claire Dunphy. Glen manages to connect Julia Sugarbaker and Tyler Perry (just go with it), and Trey figures out who the real "scoldy wife" on Modern Family is.

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Arts & Life
10:38 am
Fri June 7, 2013

From Soviet Romania To Front Stage: Charlotte Symphony's Concertmaster

Credit Briana Duggan

The Charlotte Symphony begins its summer outdoor concert series this weekend. And before the conductor steps onto Symphony Park stage, steps the orchestra’s highest ranked member: the concertmaster. He takes the seat to the left of the conductor.

For the last ten years, one man has occupied that chair: Romanian born violinist, Calin Lupanu. WFAE's Briana Duggan met with the concertmaster and discovered that the route to that chair has been a tumultuous one.

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Interviews
9:16 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'The Life That Follows' Disarming IEDs In Iraq

Brian Castner served as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer in the U.S. Air Force from 1999 to 2007, deploying to Iraq to command bomb disposal units in Balad and Kirkuk in 2005 and 2006.
Joey Campagna Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 2:30 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 8, 2012.

Brian Castner arguably had one of the most nerve-wracking jobs in the U.S. military. He commanded two Explosive Ordnance Disposal units in Iraq, where his team disabled roadside IEDs, investigated the aftermath of roadside car bombings and searched door to door to uncover bomb-makers at their homes.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
7:03 am
Fri June 7, 2013

5 Books Of Poetry To Get You Through The Summer

Andrew Bannecker

A sad tale's best for winter, Shakespeare tells us. I'm wondering if perhaps poetry, both lyrical and narrative, isn't best for summer. I'm thinking of how Keats, in "Ode to a Nightingale," describes that wonderfully musical bird as singing "of summer in full-throated ease"; and how, say, in three-time Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky's poem "Ralegh's Prizes," summer "turns her head with its dark tangle / All the way toward us" and however drowsy-making the weather, we pay attention.

All this wonderful poetry, it's filled up my throat as well:

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The Two-Way
5:56 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Justin Bieber Destined For Outer Space

Singer Justin Bieber performs during the 2013 Billboard Music Awards on May 19.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 6:32 pm

Singer Justin Bieber is the latest celebrity to score a booking on Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo, destined for its first suborbital test flight sometime this year.

The Bieb and manager Scooter Braun join the likes of Ashton Kutcher, Leonardo DiCaprio and Angelina Jolie on the elite passenger list of those willing and able to pay $250,000 for a seat on Richard Branson's commercial space-flight venture.

Sir Richard tweeted the news Thursday:

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Movie Reviews
5:01 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

A Yearly 'Purge' For A Society Working Out Its Issues

Ethan Hawke's security consultant barricades himself in his home for the annual "purge" that keeps the grimmer elements of society in check in James DeMonaco's dystopian thriller.
Daniel McFadden Universal Pictures

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:54 am

The best twists in The Twilight Zone weren't the ones that came at the end. The real genius of Rod Serling's classic series was how often and how effectively it twisted things up with simple but outlandish "What if?" queries in episode setups.

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Movie Reviews
5:01 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Covert Conflicts, Decried In 'Dirty Wars'

Reporter and author Jeremy Scahill, shown in Somalia, visited a range of conflict-plagued areas for the film Dirty Wars, an outgrowth of his writing on American anti-terrorism efforts abroad.
IFC

After the killing of Osama bin Laden in May 2011, the soldiers of the paramilitary force JSOC (Joint Special Operations Command) who carried out the operation were lionized as national heroes.

They earned more ambivalent treatment in Kathryn Bigelow's Zero Dark Thirty. And according to Dirty Wars, a documentary based on a book by investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill, their shadowy outfit has pretty much taken over America's global war on terrorism — and in flagrantly unconstitutional ways, he claims.

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Movie Reviews
5:01 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Resnais' Lively, Metatheatrical Look At Death

Sabine Azema (left) and Pierre Arditi are two of the veteran actors drawn into a convoluted retelling — and reimagining — of the Orpheus and Eurydice story in Alain Resnais' You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet.
Kino Lorber

As a relatively young man, French director Alain Resnais made films about loss, remembrance and the ghosts of a recent history that included the Holocaust, Hiroshima and the brutal Franco-Algerian war. He was 89 when he directed his latest film, You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet, which also considers the presence of the past. But the director's concern with real-life horrors has been replaced here by an outlook that's both playful and explicitly theatrical.

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