Abortion

Sarah Delia

The saga over parking and traffic violations outside of an abortion clinic in Charlotte marched on at City Council this week. The clinic had wanted there to be a parking ban on the street in front of the facility, but instead there will be a higher CMPD presence. WFAE’s Mark Rumsey spoke with Sarah Delia for an update.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The city's police and transportation department will not restrict parking outside a women's clinic in east Charlotte, City Manager Marcus Jones said at Monday night's city council meeting. The decision was made following a months-long push by abortion rights activists to ban street parking outside the clinic, to the objections of abortion rights opponents.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The Charlotte Department of Transportation says it is “evaluating” whether to enact a ban on street parking outside a women’s health clinic in east Charlotte. The ban would primarily affect a number of anti-abortion groups that have been staging near-daily protests outside the clinic for at least the last 12 years.

North Carolina has lost its appeal of a case involving abortion providers having to show pregnant women an ultrasound of their fetus. The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday it will not take up case.

The Republican-backed law required doctors to show and describe ultrasounds to pregnant women considering an abortion. 

With the pending U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on gay marriage expected, and the issue of whether North Carolina magistrate’s should be allowed a ‘religious objection’ to performing same-sex marriages, the culture wars over social issues are still being fought in earnest.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

The North Carolina General Assembly has passed a bill that requires a 72-hour waiting period for abortions.

The state House gave final approval to the bill Wednesday, sending it to Republican Gov. Pat McCrory's desk. The bill adds other rules for doctors and clinics that perform abortions and includes several unrelated criminal justice measures.

Three other states have 72-hour waiting periods: Missouri, South Dakota and Utah. Oklahoma's waiting period of that length goes into effect in November.

North Carolina General Assembly

A state House committee has passed a bill that would lengthen the mandatory waiting period before a woman could have an abortion.

A federal appeals court has struck down North Carolina’s law that says abortion providers must show pregnant women an ultrasound of their fetus.

The three-judge panel of the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals was unanimous: North Carolina’s law violates the First Amendment.

The ruling says the law is “quintessential compelled speech” that “forces physicians to say things they otherwise would not say.”

New Abortion Restrictions Take Effect

Sep 30, 2013
North Carolina General Assembly

Starting October 1, some women will have a harder time getting an abortion. That's because most parts of a controversial abortion bill take effect.

The abortion law passed this summer means that city and county employees will now have to pay for an abortion out-of-pocket because their insurance plans will no longer cover them.  

And other government insurance plans, like the health insurance exchange options offered through the Affordable Care Act, also can't cover abortions.

North Carolina General Assembly

Lawmakers in the state House have passed a bill that would place more requirements on clinics that provide abortions in North Carolina.

While some legislators say the measure is not as restrictive as a similar bill passed in the Senate last week, abortion-rights advocates say this measure could seriously restrict womens’ access to the procedure.

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